Anesthesiology CME

  • Mount Sinai School of Medicine – Anesthesiology CME

    Each activity focuses on the pre-anesthetic assessment for one condition. Recent activities include:
    • Perioperative Pain Management of the Patient With Chronic Pain
    • PreAnesthetic Assessment of the Pediatric Patient with Osteopetrosis and Lung Mass
    • PreAnesthetic Assessment of the Patient With Cirrhosis-Related Pulmonary Complications
    • Preanesthetic Assessment of the Patient with an Advance Directive
    • PreAnesthetic Considerations for a Patient With Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia
    • Preanesthetic Assessment of the Child with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    Target Audience: Anesthiesiologists

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    • Cost: $15
    • Credit hours: 2
    • CME credits awarded by: Mount Sinai School of Medicine
    • Format: On-Demand Online
  • FREE

    Organization for Advancing Critical Care Monitoring

    These areas are covered:
    Goal Directed Therapy ,Early Goal Directed Therapy, Hemodynamic Monitoring, Glucose Monitoring / Diabetes and Critical Care Pharmacology.

    Some recent titles are:
    • Making the Case for Glycemic Control: Is it a Matter of Tightness or Timing?
    • Advanced Hemodynamic Monitoring
    • Cardiac Output Monitoring vs. TEE/TTEGoal-Directed Therapy in the Operating Room
    • Physiologic Optimization Program: Physiology Based Fluid Management
    • Extravascular Lung Water: Clinical Implications
    • Critical Care Pharmacotherapy Literature Updates
    • Severe Sepsis: Early Recognition & Management Saves Lives
    • The Use of Dynamic Parameters in Perioperative Fluid Management
    • Current Trends in Management of Blood Glucose in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Target Audience: Physicians focusing on Anesthesiology, Critical Care, ER, Hospital Medicine, and Pediatrics (ICU).

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: Varies depending on course
    • Format: On-Demand Online
  • FREE

    CME: Hemodynamics – Where are We Now?

    Goal-directed therapy (GDT) has been taken as the gospel in critical care since the publication of Rivers et al.’s seminal paper on the topic demonstrating a mortality benefit in patients with severe sepsis and related shock back in late 2001, whose protocols were soon embraced and became ensconced in practice as standards of care, overlapping with other, high-acuity areas of medical specialty like surgery and emergency medicine. However, these initially results later became more mixed and equivocal on the whole when balanced in the context of more recent literature.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the present methods of fluid assessment
    • Describe the present methods of hemodynamic monitoring
    • Given patient cases, reason your approach to fluid management under various clinical circumstances

    Target Audience:

    This program has been designed for a multidisciplinary physician and nurse audience including: ICU / Anesthesia / Peri-op / Intensivists / Trauma / Critical Care

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 12/9/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 12/9/21
  • FREE

    CME: New Trends in Hemodynamics: Dynamic Assessments

    Goal-directed therapy (GDT) has been taken as the gospel in critical care since the publication of Rivers et al.’s seminal paper on the topic demonstrating a mortality benefit in patients with severe sepsis and related shock back in late 2001, whose protocols were soon embraced and became ensconced in practice as standards of care, overlapping with other, high-acuity areas of medical specialty like surgery and emergency medicine. However, these initially results later became more mixed and equivocal on the whole when balanced in the context of more recent literature.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the risks of over- and under-resuscitation
    • Describe the present methods of fluid assessment
    • Describe the present methods of hemodynamic monitoring
    • Given patient cases, reason your approach to fluid management under various clinical circumstances

    Target Audience:

    This program has been designed for a multidisciplinary physician and nurse audience including: ICU / Anesthesia / Peri-op / Intensivists / Trauma / Critical Care

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 12/9/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 12/9/21
  • FREE

    CME: Applications in Hemodynamics – Taking Us from Here to the Future: Clinical Applications

    Goal-directed therapy (GDT) has been taken as the gospel in critical care since the publication of Rivers et al.’s seminal paper on the topic demonstrating a mortality benefit in patients with severe sepsis and related shock back in late 2001, whose protocols were soon embraced and became ensconced in practice as standards of care, overlapping with other, high-acuity areas of medical specialty like surgery and emergency medicine. However, these initially results later became more mixed and equivocal on the whole when balanced in the context of more recent literature.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Given patient cases, reason your approach to fluid management under various clinical circumstances
    • Given patient cases, balance volume with vasoactive therapy in your hemodynamic stewardship of the patient

    Target Audience:

    This program has been designed for a multidisciplinary physician and nurse audience including: ICU / Anesthesia / Peri-op / Intensivists / Trauma / Critical Care

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 12/9/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 12/9/21
  • Medical Marijuana Certification Course: Oregon

    The Medical Marijuana Certification Course will help Oregon physicians make informed decisions regarding medicinal cannabis treatments for their patients. This activity provides an evidence based analysis of marijuana’s efficacy, risks and benefits in treating a wide range of state approved conditions. The science, safety and impact of medical marijuana will be explored, in order to enhance physician knowledge of this emerging healthcare resource. Worth 4 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™, this activity meets the CME requirements necessary for physicians to participate in the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program.

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    • Cost: $200
    • Credit hours: 4
    • CME credits awarded by: Global Education Group
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 4/5/20
    • Expiration of CME credit: 4/4/21
  • Medical Marijuana Certification Course: Washington

    The Medical Marijuana Certification Course will help Washington physicians make informed decisions regarding medicinal cannabis treatments for their patients. This activity provides an evidence based analysis of marijuana’s efficacy, risks and benefits in treating a wide range of state approved conditions. The science, safety and impact of medical marijuana will be explored, in order to enhance physician knowledge of this emerging healthcare resource. Worth 4 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™, this activity meets the CME requirements necessary for physicians to authorize the use of medical marijuana in the state of Washington.

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    • Cost: $200
    • Credit hours: 4
    • CME credits awarded by: Global Education Group
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 4/5/20
    • Expiration of CME credit: 4/4/21
  • FREE

    Tailored Volume Resuscitation in the Critically Ill is Achievable

    Activity Description / Statement of Need:

    In this online, self-learning activity: Goal-directed therapy (GDT) has been taken as the gospel in critical care since the publication of Rivers et al.’s seminal paper on the topic demonstrating a mortality benefit in patients with severe sepsis and related shock in late 2001. Its protocols were soon embraced and became ensconced in practice as standards of care, overlapping with other, high-acuity areas of medical specialty like surgery and emergency medicine. One challenge has been the conventional approach’s embrace a ‘recipe-book’ or one-size-fits all approach with directed by static parameters. The literature clearly demonstrates that indiscriminate administration of fluids is associated with a number of complications, increased length of stay, and mortality in a diverse array of patient populations, findings all the more important because only half of hemodynamically unstable patients respond to fluids. The benefits of dynamic monitoring strategies in a range of patient populations have been borne out not only by meta-analyses but also recent clinical trial evidence. 

    Target Audience:

    Physicians and nurses in the following areas of specialty: Anesthesiology, critical care, emergency medicine, and surgery.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the CMS goal of resuscitation in severe sepsis and septic shock.
    • Recognize potential adverse outcomes of under and over resuscitation of the critically ill.
    • Understand variability indices and changes in stroke volume to predict volume responsiveness.
    • Recognize applications and limitations of non-invasive hemodynamic monitoring.
    • Recognize potential benefits of guided volume resuscitation strategies.
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    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 4/7/2021
    • Expiration of CME credit: 4/7/2023
  • 25% OFF W/ CODE: CME25
    FEATURED

    Perioperative Management

    Perioperative Management CME from the Experts

    The Perioperative Management continuing medical education course focuses on current and concise knowledge to improve patient outcomes through preoperative evaluation, intraoperative management, and postoperative care.

    Directed by Nauder Faraday, MD, MPH, and Sean Berenholtz, MD, MHS, FCCM, from Johns Hopkins, a leader in perioperative medicine, this online CME includes case-based lectures on topics like cardiac and pulmonary risk assessment, perioperative renal dysfunction, pain management, management of diabetes and hyperglycemia, and more. It will help you to better:

    • Illustrate effective management of bleeding and thrombotic risks in surgical patients
    • Identify strategies for controlling postoperative pain and reducing opioid dependency
    • Outline ways to prevent, diagnose and treat common infections that complicate surgical procedures
    • Discuss multi-disciplinary approaches to minimize complications and improve patient outcomes

    Learning Objectives

    Aftre completing this activity, the participant will demonstrate the ability to:

    • Describe current guidelines for preoperative cardiac and pulmonary risk assessment and list several ways to predict and prevent cardiac and pulmonary complications using preoperative testing and intraoperative and postoperative interventions.
    • Describe bleeding and thrombotic risks in surgical patients and list several strategies to reduce complications through evidence-based use of blood conservation methods, transfusion, coagulation testing, anticoagulant reversal agents, and/or management of anti-thrombotic drug therapies.
    • Describe strategies to control acute postoperative pain using multimodal analgesia and reduce risk for chronic opioid dependency.
    • Recognize how to prevent, diagnose, and treat common healthcare associated infections that complicate surgical procedures.
    • Describe the perioperative complications associated with diabetes, renal insufficiency, delirium, and frailty, and list management strategies to optimize outcomes in patients with these medical conditions.
    • Recognize the impact of structural and cultural factors related to the healthcare system (e.g., provider stress, safety culture, communication strategies) on the safety and quality of healthcare delivery, and describe the potential of various multi-disciplinary programs (e.g., enhanced recovery after surgery, perioperative surgical home, CUSP) to improve health outcomes.

    Intended Audience

    This activity is intended for anesthesiologists, internal medicine specialists, hospitalists, surgeons, family practitioners, nurse anesthetists, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants.

    CONFIDENTIALITY DISCLAIMER FOR CME ACTIVITY PARTICIPANTS

    I certify that I am attending a Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine CME activity for accredited training and/or educational purposes. I understand that while I am attending in this capacity, I may be exposed to “protected health information,” as that term is defined and used in Hopkins policies and in the federal HIPAA privacy regulations (the “Privacy Regulations”). Protected health information is information about a person’s health or treatment that identifies the person.

    I pledge and agree to use and disclose any of this protected health information only for the training and/or educational purposes of my visit and to keep the information confidential. I agree not to post or discuss this protected health information, including pictures and/or videos, on any social media site (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, etc.), in any electronic messaging program or through any portable electronic device.

    I understand that I may direct to the Johns Hopkins Privacy Officer any questions I have about my obligations under this Confidentiality Pledge or under any of the Hopkins policies and procedures and applicable laws and regulations related to confidentiality. The contact information is: Johns Hopkins Privacy Officer, telephone: 410-735-6509, e-mail: [email protected]

    “The Office of Continuing Medical Education at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, as provider of this activity, has relayed information with the CME attendees/participants and certifies that the visitor is attending for training, education and/or observation purposes only.”

    For CME questions, please contact the CME Office
    (410) 955-2959 or e-mail [email protected]
    For CME Certificates, please call (410) 502-9634.

    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Office of Continuing Medical Education
    Turner 20/720 Rutland Avenue
    Baltimore, Maryland 21205-2195

    Reviewed & Approved by:
    General Counsel, Johns Hopkins Medicine (4/1/03)
    (Updated 4/09 and 3/14)

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    • Cost: $795
    • Credit hours: 18.5
    • CME credits awarded by: Oakstone Publishing, LLC.
    • Format: On-Demand Online, Online Video, Online Audio, Audio CD
    • Material last updated: April 1, 2019
    • Expiration of CME credit: April 1, 2022
  • 25% OFF W/ CODE: CME25
    FEATURED

    Practical Reviews: Opioid Prescribing Practices

    Battling the Opioid Epidemic

    Opioid Prescribing Practices sheds light on today’s leading medical crisis and examines a clinician’s role in combatting the epidemic. You’ll also hear one doctor’s personal story of loss in this two-part audio series presented by Practical Reviews:

    PART 1: Managing Opioid Therapy in High-Risk Patients
    Robert N. Jamison, PhD, Donald Deye, MD, FACP, and Melinda Deye, NP-C, discuss responsible prescribing, including a look at non-opiate analgesics and managing high-risk patients. They also discuss the paradox of patients whose chronic pain has been managed successfully on long-term opioid therapy. Get practical tips for identifying high-risk patients, compliance testing, intervention strategies and more.

    PART 2: Opioid Epidemic
    After the loss of his son to a heroin overdose, A. Omar Abubaker, DMD, PhD, sought formal education on pain, pain management, opioids and addiction. In this presentation, he details alarming overdose statistics, and outlines opioid side effects and addiction risks. Learn optional management strategies for treating patients with acute and chronic pain and more.

    Learning Objectives

    Upon completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

    • Define the terms “pain” and “chronic pain.”
    • Provide examples of potential high-risk patients for opioid misuse based on the following 3 areas: family history, personal history/behavior, and environmental factors.
    • Describe how a health care provider might assess a patient’s chronic pain and measure the outcomes after initiating treatment.
    • Discuss the value of physical therapy and relaxation therapy in the management of chronic pain.
    • List at least five non-opioid drugs that may offer first-line therapy for non-cancer-related pain management.
    • Summarize the Centers for Disease Control’s (CDC) guidelines that pertain to proper prescribing practice for pain medications.
    • Discuss the paradox of using opioids to treat patients whose chronic pain has been successfully managed with long-term opioids up to this time.
    • State whether the incidence of providers actually losing their license or having any legal action taken against them regarding opioid prescribing practices is large or small.
    • Describe Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs and discuss their use in the prescribing of opioid medications.
    • Discuss how the smartphone app called the Brigham and Women’s Hospital Pain App can be used as part of a patient’s chronic pain management program.
    • Differentiate between acute and chronic pain.
    • Recall from memory important statistics about the number of deaths due to drug overdose in the U.S. and how this relates to the number of people lost in 911 and the number of soldiers killed in the Vietnam War.
    • Summarize at least 3 steps that providers can take to reduce the opioid epidemic.
    • List some nonopioid alternatives to managing mild pain, moderate to severe pain, and severe pain.
    • Discuss the impact that new federal and state regulations on opioid prescribing practices is having on prescription-related overdoses and provider prescribing practices.
    • Describe at least 4 topics that providers must discuss in detail with their patients before giving them a postoperative prescription for opioid pain medications.
    • List at least 3 common opioid-related side effects.
    • Differentiate between the addictive potential of Schedule I, Schedule II, Schedule III, Schedule IV, and Schedule V narcotics.
    • Summarize the discrepancy between addiction treatment versus other diseases as it relates to access to care.

    Target Audience

    This educational activity was designed for Physicians, Nurse Practitioners, Physician Assistants, Dentists, and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons.

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    • Cost: $99
    • Credit hours: 8.5
    • CME credits awarded by: Oakstone Publishing, LLC
    • Material last updated: January 31, 2018
    • Expiration of CME credit: January 31, 2021