Free Oncology CME

  • FREE

    Virtual Tumor Board: Diagnosis and Management of Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    In this virtual tumor board, David P. Steensma, MD, FACP, Reza Nejati, MD, and Ilene Galinsky, BSN, MSN, ANP-C, discuss patient and tumor characteristics that inform personalized care plans, risk stratification, and supportive care strategies for patients with MDS.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: i3 Health in partnership with Anaplastic Anemia & Myelodysplastic Syndromes International Foundation
    • Format: Online, On Demand
  • FREE

    Update on Therapeutic Advances in T-Cell Lymphoma

    Join Steven M. Horwitz, MD, Member and Attending Physician at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, as he discusses guideline recommendations for differential diagnosis of TCL, novel treatment strategies, and best practices for managing side effects in this case-based live webinar series! Register today!

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: i3 Health
    • Format: Webinar
  • FREE

    CME: Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) treatment: Therapeutic updates, best practices, and barriers to care

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third-leading cause of cancer deaths in the U.S. While a majority of patients are diagnosed before their disease has metastasized, a fifth of patients have advanced disease at the time of diagnosis. Early detection and screening have been shown to significantly reduce CRC mortality, and screening is widely recommended for average-risk adults beginning at age 50 years, (as well as earlier for individuals at higher risk). Since the mid-1990s, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, American Cancer Society, and other groups have recommended several modalities for screening: fecal occult blood testing (FOBT), flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, and barium enema. Recent years have seen the addition of newer screening technologies, including stool DNA, computed tomographic colonography, and capsule endoscopy.

    Target Audience:

    Healthcare professionals including: medical oncologists, primary care physicians, pathologists, gastroenterologists, and managed care medical care directors; physicians assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists specializing in oncology; and other clinicians who are involved in providing diagnostic and therapeutic services for patients with CRC.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 2/3/2021
    • Expiration of CME credit: 2/3/2023
  • FREE

    Addressing skeletal-related events in prostate cancer

    Each year, an estimated 170,000 cases of prostate cancer are diagnosed. Although early prostate cancer may be cured with surgery or radiation therapy, more than 50% of men will experience recurrence after definitive treatment. The use of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for intermediate-risk, high-risk, and recurrent prostate cancer has greatly increased in the last 15 years, extending 10-year survival by nearly 25% compared with observation alone. New treatment options for advanced prostate cancer have further improved survival and increased the number of patients living with non-metastatic and metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (nmCRPC and mCRPC). Despite the established improvements in survival associated with hormonal treatments, ADT has been associated with well-characterized negative effects on bone health. Indeed, bone metastases and subsequent skeletal-related events (SREs) are the primary driver of both morbidity and mortality among people with CRPC. In a study of 2234 men aged 65 years or older with a diagnosis of CRPC, 40% experienced SREs over a median follow-up of 10.6 months. Maintaining bone health in patients with CRPC requires routine monitoring and proactive management.

    Target Audience:

    The following healthcare professionals: urologists, medical and radiation oncologists, primary care physicians, nuclear medicine specialists and radiologists, and endocrinologists; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and pharmacists who treat prostate cancer; and any other healthcare professionals who commonly care for patients with prostate cancer.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Recall the relative efficacy and safety of presently available agents used to for bone health and fracture prevention in patients with prostate cancer
    • Describe the identification and management of disease and intervention adverse effects on patients
    • Using details in a patient case, recommend an appropriate pharmacotherapeutic treatment plan for the purpose of preventing SREs in patients with prostate cancer
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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: .75
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 07/31/2020
    • Expiration of CME credit: 07/31/2022
  • FREE

    Treating Oncology Patients During COVID-19

    Activity Description / Statement of Need: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to unprecedented changes in health care delivery worldwide, affecting the way that nearly every medical specialty can safely practice. As with other fields of medicine, oncology has its own challenges in navigating the pandemic. Based on pre-pandemic estimates, 1.8 million new cancer diagnoses would be expected in 2020, equating to approximately 5,000 new cancer diagnoses per day. Evidence thus far suggests that COVID-19 is associated with significantly more complications and a higher risk of death in patients with cancer or with a history of cancer. Furthermore, patients with cancer have also been shown to have a higher COVID-19 infection rate than the general population, suggesting increased susceptibility, potentially due to immunosuppression, comorbidities, or poor health status related to cancer or its treatment. Based on these data, oncology specialists are said to be fighting “a war on two fronts” by balancing the risks of COVID-19 transmission and acquisition with the risks of delayed cancer diagnosis and treatment. This represents an unmet need among oncology practitioners as they navigate this new health care landscape.

    Target Audience:

    Healthcare professionals, including medical oncologists; radiation oncologists; surgical oncologists; surgeons; radiologists; nuclear medicine specialists; nurse practitioners and physician assistants who practice in oncology; and other healthcare providers who manage cancer.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Recall the symptoms of COVID-19 infection and best practices for screening patients, health care providers, and staff in the oncology setting.
    • Develop a plan to provide oncology care in the setting of the COVID-19 pandemic.
    • Describe the risks of delaying cancer diagnosis and treatment against the risk of COVID-19 exposure and infection.
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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: .75
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 09/22/2020
    • Expiration of CME credit: 09/22/2022
  • FREE

    Advances in Treating Triple-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer: Optimizing Pharmacotherapeutic Management Strategies

    Over a quarter million women and almost 2,700 men in the U.S. are diagnosed with breast cancer each year, and it is the second leading cause of cancer death in women. The prognosis associated with breast has improved in the last few decades due in larger part to earlier detection. Detection at the loco-regional stage is associated with a five-year overall survival (OS) rate of ≥ 85% in contrast to 27% for distant or metastatic breast cancer (MBC).

    Because it is not curable, the goals of care in MBC are: palliation of symptoms, improvement of quality-of-life, and extension of survival. Hormone receptor positivity has traditionally conferred a better prognosis. In contrast, the presence the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is associated with a more negative prognosis. Finally, there remains a basal-like group lacking in those markers, miscellaneously labeled triple-negative (TNBC), with some cancers observed to be more aggressive, but with the overall population similar in prognosis to hormone-positive breast cancer, owing to TNBC’s heterogenous nature.

    Target Audience:

    The following healthcare professionals: Medical oncologists; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and pharmacists who practice in oncology; and any other HCPs with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with breast cancer.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the prognostic and treatment implications of TN status in the diagnosis and treatment of MBC.
    • Describe treatment options presently available for TN MBC, including safety, and apply them to patient cases using evidence-based medicine.
    • Describe emerging treatment options presently available for TN MBC, their mechanisms of action and safety, and anticipated place in therapy.
    • Discuss barriers patients with TN MBC experience in attempting to access care, including burden of disease and adverse consequences of therapy, and propose ways to ameliorate them.
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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 05/20/2020
    • Expiration of CME credit: 05/20/2021
  • FREE

    Differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC): therapeutic updates and optimizing treatment

    The incidence of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is on the rise over the past 10 years and roughly 57,000 new cases were reported in 2017 alone.

    After completing Differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC): therapeutic updates and optimizing treatment physicians will better be able to: 

    • Recognize factors affecting the diagnosis, staging, and prognosis of patients with DTC.
    • Identify present and emerging pharmacotherapeutic treatments for the management of unresectable DTC and apply them to patient cases using evidence-based medicine
    • Describe how to manage challenges that arise during treatment with approved and investigational medicines for DTC, including adverse effect management, and apply** that knowledge to a patient case
    • Describe the challenges associated with DTC treatment, focusing specifically on the risks (e.g., adverse drug reactions, drug interactions, etc.) of the agents used to treat the disease, and apply that information in a patient case

     

    Target Audience: medical oncologists, endocrinologists; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in oncology; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with DTC.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 0.75
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: March 15, 2019
    • Expiration of CME credit: March 15, 2021
  • FREE

    Ovarian Cancer: Enhancing Treatment with Targets and Companion Diagnostics

    Ovarian Cancer: Enhancing Treatment with Targets and Companion Diagnostics consists of a single presentation with discussion featuring Drs. Bradley J. Monk, MD and Robert L. Coleman, MD.

    At the conclusion of Ovarian Cancer: Enhancing Treatment with Targets and Companion Diagnostics, you will be able to:
    • Appraise the pathophysiology of ovarian cancer and their associated mutations, including germline and somatic BRCA mutations and other DNA repair deficiencies such as loss of heterozygosity
    • Evaluate the safety and efficacy data of PARP inhibitors
    • Use the latest diagnostic tools and genetic testing to identify patients who would benefit from PARP inhibitor therapy

    Target Audience:
    This program is intended for Medical and gynecologic oncologists, oncology nurses, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, and other health care professionals, including gynecologists, primary care physicians, physicians-in-training, and physician assistants involved in and/or interested in the management of patients with ovarian cancer.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: Postgraduate Institute for Medicine
    • Format: On-Demand Online, Online Video
    • Material last updated: October 20, 2017
    • Expiration of CME credit: April 20, 2018
  • FREE

    New Horizons in Personalized Care for Metastatic Bladder Cancer

    New Horizons in Personalized Care for Metastatic Bladder Cancer consists of a single lecture, New Horizons in Personalized Care for Metastatic Bladder Cancer with discussion by Matthew I. Milowsky, MD and Matthew Galsky, MD.

    After viewing New Horizons in Personalized Care for Metastatic Bladder Cancer, you will be better able to:
    • Evaluate the role of new targeted and immune-based agents in the first- and second-line metastatic settings, and how they can be integrated into practice
    • Apply strategies and tools that enhance patient-clinician communication and shared decision making processes

    Target Audiences:
    This program is intended for Medical/genitourinary oncologists, urologists, surgeons, radiologists, and other health care professionals (primary care physicians, physicians-in-training, oncology nurses, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, physician assistants, etc.) involved and/or interested in the therapeutic management of patients with bladder cancer.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: Albert Einstein College of Medicine
    • Format: On-Demand Online, Online Video
    • Material last updated: August 11, 2017
    • Expiration of CME credit: February 11, 2018