Free Oncology CME

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    Healio Free Hematology/Oncology CME

    Find out what over 50,000 of your colleagues already know. Earn credits faster and easier with Healio CME.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: Varies
  • FREE

    ScientiaCME Hematology/Oncology

    Target Audience: Hematologists

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 7.25
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Expiration of CME credit: Two years after release
  • FREE

    Treatment strategies for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC): Now it’s personal(ized)

    Activity Description / Statement of Need:

    In this online, self-learning activity:

    Cancer of the liver is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths and one of the more common types of cancer worldwide, with an incidence of over 40,000 in the U.S. and an annual mortality rate of over 30,000 new cases each year. Of all the primary liver cancers, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common form, representing 80%, and its incidence has risen threefold in the U.S. over the past 40 years. The largest risk factor is cirrhosis due to chronic hepatitis B or C viruses, and additional risk factors include excess alcohol consumption, diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and smoking. HCC is diagnosed in the intermediate or advanced stages of disease the vast majority of the time and carries a grave prognosis with a five-year survival rate of eighteen percent.

    This learning activity has been designed to bring HCPs’ knowledge of optimal, personalized strategies for the management of advanced / unresectable HCC and to improve their competence and performance in treating it.

    Target Audience:

    The following healthcare professionals: Medical oncologists, hepatologists, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in oncology; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with advanced / unresectable HCC.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 12/16/2021
    • Expiration of CME credit: 12/16/2022
  • FREE

    At the cutting edge of treatment advanced diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL): Updates in medical management and individualizing patient care

    Activity Description / Statement of Need:

    In this online, self-learning activity:

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common type of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), making up just under a third of NHL cases. In the United States, there are roughly 7 cases of DLBCL per 100,000 patients per year. The pathophysiology of DLBCL is complex and not fully understood; but is characterized by a widespread increase of very large, mature B-cells arising from various gene mutations. DLBCL is heterogenous group of tumors and includes many diverse subtypes based on location, presence of other cells within the tumor, and whether the patient has other related illnesses. Advanced age, immunodeficiency, and Epstein-Barr virus are associated risk factors for DLBCL. The disease is considered an AIDS-defining malignancy, marking the point at which an HIV infection is considered AIDS. Diagnosis of DLBCL is made by a tissue biopsy, and morphology and immunophenotyping play a crucial role in determining which subtype of DLBCL a patient has.

    This learning activity has been designed to bring HCPs’ knowledge of present and emerging strategies for treatment and management of DLBCL up to date and to improve their competence and performance in treating it.

    Target Audience:

    Hematologists and oncologists; physician assistants, nurse practitioners,  pharmacists who practice in oncology, and any other HCPs with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with DLBCL.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1.5
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 03/22/2022
    • Expiration of CME credit: 03/22/2023
  • FREE

    Practice updates in treating advanced-stage gastric and gastroesophageal junction cancers

    Activity Description / Statement of Need:
    In this online, self-learning activity:

    Gastric cancer (GC) accounts for over 26,000 new cases and 11,000 related deaths in the U.S. annually, and while malignancies of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction (GEJC) are associated with 19,000 and 15,000, respectively. GEJ tumors clinically more often resemble gastric than esophageal cancers, and GEJ cancers are often included in studies of GC. Adenocarcinomas represent more than 95% of gastric cancers and around 75% of esophageal cancers in the US. Systemic therapy is the mainstay of treatment for advanced and metastatic disease. There is a widening number of treatment options for GC and GEJC with approved and investigational agents. This learning activity has therefore been designed to bring HCPs’ knowledge of the rationale behind treatment of GC and GEJC up to date and to enhance their competence and performance in the management of it.

    Target Audience:
    HCPs including: Medical oncologists, pathologists, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and pharmacists specializing in oncology; and any other clinicians involved or interested in the treatment of GC & GEJC.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1.25
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 10/31/2021
    • Expiration of CME credit: 10/31/2022
  • FREE

    CME: Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) treatment: Therapeutic updates, best practices, and barriers to care

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third-leading cause of cancer deaths in the U.S. While a majority of patients are diagnosed before their disease has metastasized, a fifth of patients have advanced disease at the time of diagnosis. Early detection and screening have been shown to significantly reduce CRC mortality, and screening is widely recommended for average-risk adults beginning at age 50 years, (as well as earlier for individuals at higher risk). Since the mid-1990s, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, American Cancer Society, and other groups have recommended several modalities for screening: fecal occult blood testing (FOBT), flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, and barium enema. Recent years have seen the addition of newer screening technologies, including stool DNA, computed tomographic colonography, and capsule endoscopy.

    Target Audience:

    Healthcare professionals including: medical oncologists, primary care physicians, pathologists, gastroenterologists, and managed care medical care directors; physicians assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists specializing in oncology; and other clinicians who are involved in providing diagnostic and therapeutic services for patients with CRC.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 2/3/2021
    • Expiration of CME credit: 2/3/2023
  • FREE

    Addressing skeletal-related events in prostate cancer

    Each year, an estimated 170,000 cases of prostate cancer are diagnosed. Although early prostate cancer may be cured with surgery or radiation therapy, more than 50% of men will experience recurrence after definitive treatment. The use of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for intermediate-risk, high-risk, and recurrent prostate cancer has greatly increased in the last 15 years, extending 10-year survival by nearly 25% compared with observation alone. New treatment options for advanced prostate cancer have further improved survival and increased the number of patients living with non-metastatic and metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (nmCRPC and mCRPC). Despite the established improvements in survival associated with hormonal treatments, ADT has been associated with well-characterized negative effects on bone health. Indeed, bone metastases and subsequent skeletal-related events (SREs) are the primary driver of both morbidity and mortality among people with CRPC. In a study of 2234 men aged 65 years or older with a diagnosis of CRPC, 40% experienced SREs over a median follow-up of 10.6 months. Maintaining bone health in patients with CRPC requires routine monitoring and proactive management.

    Target Audience:

    The following healthcare professionals: urologists, medical and radiation oncologists, primary care physicians, nuclear medicine specialists and radiologists, and endocrinologists; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and pharmacists who treat prostate cancer; and any other healthcare professionals who commonly care for patients with prostate cancer.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Recall the relative efficacy and safety of presently available agents used to for bone health and fracture prevention in patients with prostate cancer
    • Describe the identification and management of disease and intervention adverse effects on patients
    • Using details in a patient case, recommend an appropriate pharmacotherapeutic treatment plan for the purpose of preventing SREs in patients with prostate cancer
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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: .75
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 07/31/2020
    • Expiration of CME credit: 07/31/2022
  • FREE

    Treating Oncology Patients During COVID-19

    Activity Description / Statement of Need: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to unprecedented changes in health care delivery worldwide, affecting the way that nearly every medical specialty can safely practice. As with other fields of medicine, oncology has its own challenges in navigating the pandemic. Based on pre-pandemic estimates, 1.8 million new cancer diagnoses would be expected in 2020, equating to approximately 5,000 new cancer diagnoses per day. Evidence thus far suggests that COVID-19 is associated with significantly more complications and a higher risk of death in patients with cancer or with a history of cancer. Furthermore, patients with cancer have also been shown to have a higher COVID-19 infection rate than the general population, suggesting increased susceptibility, potentially due to immunosuppression, comorbidities, or poor health status related to cancer or its treatment. Based on these data, oncology specialists are said to be fighting “a war on two fronts” by balancing the risks of COVID-19 transmission and acquisition with the risks of delayed cancer diagnosis and treatment. This represents an unmet need among oncology practitioners as they navigate this new health care landscape.

    Target Audience:

    Healthcare professionals, including medical oncologists; radiation oncologists; surgical oncologists; surgeons; radiologists; nuclear medicine specialists; nurse practitioners and physician assistants who practice in oncology; and other healthcare providers who manage cancer.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Recall the symptoms of COVID-19 infection and best practices for screening patients, health care providers, and staff in the oncology setting.
    • Develop a plan to provide oncology care in the setting of the COVID-19 pandemic.
    • Describe the risks of delaying cancer diagnosis and treatment against the risk of COVID-19 exposure and infection.
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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: .75
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 09/22/2020
    • Expiration of CME credit: 09/22/2022
  • FREE

    Advances in Treating Triple-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer: Optimizing Pharmacotherapeutic Management Strategies

    Over a quarter million women and almost 2,700 men in the U.S. are diagnosed with breast cancer each year, and it is the second leading cause of cancer death in women. The prognosis associated with breast has improved in the last few decades due in larger part to earlier detection. Detection at the loco-regional stage is associated with a five-year overall survival (OS) rate of ≥ 85% in contrast to 27% for distant or metastatic breast cancer (MBC).

    Because it is not curable, the goals of care in MBC are: palliation of symptoms, improvement of quality-of-life, and extension of survival. Hormone receptor positivity has traditionally conferred a better prognosis. In contrast, the presence the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is associated with a more negative prognosis. Finally, there remains a basal-like group lacking in those markers, miscellaneously labeled triple-negative (TNBC), with some cancers observed to be more aggressive, but with the overall population similar in prognosis to hormone-positive breast cancer, owing to TNBC’s heterogenous nature.

    Target Audience:

    The following healthcare professionals: Medical oncologists; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and pharmacists who practice in oncology; and any other HCPs with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with breast cancer.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the prognostic and treatment implications of TN status in the diagnosis and treatment of MBC.
    • Describe treatment options presently available for TN MBC, including safety, and apply them to patient cases using evidence-based medicine.
    • Describe emerging treatment options presently available for TN MBC, their mechanisms of action and safety, and anticipated place in therapy.
    • Discuss barriers patients with TN MBC experience in attempting to access care, including burden of disease and adverse consequences of therapy, and propose ways to ameliorate them.
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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 05/20/2020
    • Expiration of CME credit: 05/20/2021
  • FREE

    SIO University Interventional Oncology

    Earn CME with these new modules on lung cancer which include education on advances in lung cancer treatment, surgical and radiofrequency-ablative techniques, targeted therapies, and immunotherapies. Each takes less than 30 minutes to complete!

    Visit IO University to access this free education now!

    Target Audiences:
    Clinicians practicing interventional oncology (IO) or those who are interested in learning more about IO.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 3.25
    • CME credits awarded by: The France Foundation in collaboration with the Society of Interventional Oncology
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: October 2017
    • Expiration of CME credit: October 2018