Free Pediatrics CME

  • FREE

    Free Pediatrics CME Courses from Pri-Med® – Designed for Primary Care Clinicians

    As a primary care clinician, you treat the whole family in many cases, so it’s important to stay up to date on topics you will encounter frequently with pediatric patients. Complete one of our free pediatric CME courses to learn practical clinical pearls you can use in your practice right away.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: Varies by Course
    • CME credits awarded by: pmiCME, the accredited division of Pri-Med®
    • Format: On-Demand Courses Online
    • Material last updated: Continuously Updated
    • Expiration of CME credit: Varies by Course
  • FREE

    CME: Fabry disease: Updates from recent research findings

    Fabry disease is characterized by a deficiency of the glycoside hydrolase enzyme alpha galactosidase A, resulting in the accumulation of the glycolipid globotriaosylceramide throughout the body, particularly prominently in the blood vessels.

    After completing this course, physicians will better be able to:

    • Describe the pathogenesis, clinical presentations, complications, and epidemiology of Fabry disease including updated material presented at the 15th Annual WORLDSymposium
    • Describe principles and problems regarding screening for and diagnosing Fabry disease that can applied to patient cases
    • Describe emerging therapies for Fabry disease based on research presented at the 15th Annual WORLDSymposium
    • Design and implement appropriate therapeutic plans for treatment of Fabry disease based on research presented at the 15th Annual WORLDSymposium

    Target Audience: cardiologists, nephrologists, pediatricians, and primary care physicians; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who may clinically encounter patients with Fabry disease.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1.25
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 6/25/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 6/25/21
  • FREE

    Advances in Nursing Care for Pediatric Patients with High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    Advances in Nursing Care for Pediatric Patients with High-Risk Neuroblastoma consists of two presentations with discussion: Optimal Nursing Strategies to Manage Pediatric Patients with High-Risk Neuroblastoma and Recurrent/Refractory Disease of Pediatric Neuroblastoma: Enhancing the Role of the Nurse.

    At the conclusion of Advances in Nursing Care for Pediatric Patients with High-Risk Neuroblastoma, you will be able to:
    • Review the fundamentals of diagnosing, treating, and managing high-risk pediatric neuroblastoma
    • Examine strategies to improve supportive care for children with high-risk neuroblastoma
    • Examine the aspects of parental decision-making regarding appropriate care for children with recurrent/refractory neuroblastoma
    • Plan strategies to improve the dialogue and working relationship with parents/caregivers of pediatric patients regarding the goals of care through the treatment continuum and beyond

    Nursing Educational Objective:
    After completing Advances in Nursing Care for Pediatric Patients with High-Risk Neuroblastoma, you should be able to:
    • Provide appropriate care and counsel for patients and their families

    Target Audiences:
    This program is intended for pediatric oncology nurses, pediatric nurses, oncology nurses, nurse practitioners, nurse managers, infusion nurses, research nurses, physician assistants, and other health care providers who care for or have an interest in pediatric patients with high-risk neuroblastoma.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 2
    • CME credits awarded by: Postgraduate Institute for Medicine
    • Format: On-Demand Online, Online Video
    • Material last updated: September 29, 2017
    • Expiration of CME credit: September 29, 2018
  • FREE

    CME: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in Children and Adolescents: Updates from APA 2019

    ADHD is a common neuropsychiatric disorder, estimated to affect 7.2% of school age children worldwide and 11% in the US. The presence of the disorder is often not detectable until school workload increases, and it has a significant impact on child and adolescent development, health, education, and family situations. There is evidence of a wide variability in clinicians’ ability to diagnose ADHD, suggesting opportunities for improvement and a gap in care that might be remedied by CME.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Summarize the most impactful findings presented at the APA 2019 meeting relating to pediatric ADHD related to disease diagnosis and apply them to patient cases.
    • Summarize the most impactful findings presented at the APA 2019 meeting relating to pediatric ADHD related to evaluation of degree therapeutic success and apply them to patient cases.
    • Summarize the most impactful findings presented at the APA 2019 meeting relating to pediatric ADHD related to emerging therapies and apply them to patient cases.
    • Summarize the most impactful findings presented at the APA 2019 meeting relating to pediatric ADHD related to quantifying benefit and risk of disease progression and apply them to patient cases.

    Target Audience:

    The following healthcare professionals: psychiatrists, primary care physicians, pediatricians; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in psychiatry; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter pediatric patients with ADHD.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 10/6/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 10/6/21
  • FREE

    CME: Updates in vaccine-preventable diseases: meningococcal meningitis

    Meningococcal disease is a potentially severe bacterial infection caused by Neisseria meningitidis that may lead to serious sequelae and death in some even with appropriate treatment. N. meningitidis is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis and sepsis in the United States. Since the peak of the disease in the late 1990s, the incidence has declined annually and was at historic low rate of 0.11 per 100,000 population (349 cases) in the year 2017. Among the identified bacterial serogroups, B, C, and Y cause the majority of cases in the United States. Sixty percent of cases among patients 0-59 months and 50% of cases among 17-23 years of age are caused by serogroup B. Seventy-three percent of all cases among eleven year old or more are caused by serogroups C, W, or Y.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Recall epidemiology, clinical features, and complications of meningococcal meningitis
    • Recognize high-risk groups (e.g., 16-23 years of age) and describe the importance of immunizing them
    • Describe present meningococcal vaccination recommendations, and apply them to patient cases
    • Describe the importance of vaccine series completion to patients in the prevention of invasive meningococcal disease caused by various serotypes
    • Formulate an approaches to engaging with adolescents and young adults regarding meningococcal vaccination

    Target Audience:

    The following HCPs: primary care physicians, pediatricians, and public health professionals; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in family medicine; and any other clinicians with an interest in or who commonly encounter patients eligible for vaccination against meningococcal disease.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 9/24/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 9/24/21
  • FREE

    CME: The problem with vaccines: public hesitancy and refusal

    Universal vaccination is one of the most important public health initiatives of the last century. The rates of vaccine-preventable illnesses have dropped precipitously with each introduction of an effective vaccine. Vaccinations not only protect the public against specific infectious diseases but also reduce future consequences, sequelae, and complications of disease, such as in the cases of: human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine and cancer; rotavirus vaccine and type 1 diabetes; and the measles vaccine and all-cause mortality. Among people born between 1994 and 2013, vaccination is responsible for the prevention of 322 million illnesses, 21 million hospitalizations, and 732,000 deaths, resulting in a savings of nearly $1.7 trillion in total costs. Extrapolating these predictions across all generations, the benefits of universal vaccination are considerable. Despite the many benefits of vaccination and the relatively low risks, vaccine hesitancy is a growing concern among health care professionals and has led to the resurgence of vaccine-preventable illnesses in pockets of the United States.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe common barriers to adherence to recommended vaccination schedules
    • Discuss ways in which to provide strong recommendations for vaccinations while dispelling myths among patients and caregivers
    • Describe vaccination benefits and risks with patients using techniques that have been shown to improve patient satisfaction and vaccine uptake
    • Explain methods to improve vaccination adherence, and implement strategies to improve accessibility, simplify vaccination schedules, and maximize the opportunities for vaccination

    Target Audience:

    The following HCPs: primary care physicians, pediatricians, and public health professionals; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in adult internal medicine and pediatrics; and any other clinicians who commonly encounter patients eligible for protection against vaccine-preventable diseases.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 9/16/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 9/16/21
  • FREE

    CME: Treatment strategies in Fabry disease

    Fabry disease is characterized by a deficiency of the glycoside hydrolase enzyme alpha galactosidase A, resulting in the accumulation of the glycolipid globotriaosylceramide throughout the body, particularly prominently in the blood vessels. A defect in the enzyme alpha galactosidase A results in glycosphingolipid accumulation, ultimately leading to multi-organ dysfunction and the patient’s premature death. Early symptoms, which occur during childhood, involve pain and may include Raynaud phenomenon, paresthesias, and arthralgia in the extremities and proximal limbs, as well as impaired gastrointestinal emptying, resulting in abdominal pain, diarrhea, early satiety, postprandial bloating, nausea, and vomiting. In adulthood, the disease’s impact spreads beyond and begins to affect the cardiac and renal systems.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the importance of quick and accurate Fabry disease diagnosis and treatment.
    • Using established methods, determine likelihood of Fabry disease given a patient case.
    • Appropriately describe available therapies used for treatment of Fabry disease and explain current literature supporting use of those therapies.
    • Design and implement an appropriate therapeutic plan for treatment of Fabry disease.
    • Describe future therapies currently being investigated for the treatment of Fabry disease.

    Target Audience: The following healthcare professionals: cardiologists, nephrologists, pediatricians, and primary care physicians; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who may clinically encounter patients with Fabry disease.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 9/4/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 9/4/21
  • FREE

    CME: Prevention and management of influenza infection

    Influenza has been recognized as a global public health menace since at least 100 years ago with the 1918-19 pandemic, which infected an estimated one-third of the world’s population and was responsible for the deaths of one in ten, or 50 million, of those infected. While some have contended that a significant number of deaths associated with the 1918 pandemic may have actually been attributable to acid-base derangements and pulmonary edema associated with contemporary aspirin dosing in the toxic range of two to eight times what is presently the maximum recommended dose – it remains a significant public health concern, with the 2017-2018 flu season in recent decades with an estimated 80,000 deaths (typical range 12,000-56,000 per year),coming with an annual cost of $16 billion.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Determine the impact of influenza infection
    • Describe influenza vaccination recommendations and apply them to patient cases
    • Describe treatment recommendations and apply them to patient cases
    • Describe present challenges to the prevention and treatment of influenza and develop strategies to combat them

    Target Audience:

    Healthcare professionals specializing in: infectious disease, internal medicine, and pediatrics; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who specialize in the aforementioned areas; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with influenza.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 7/23/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 7/23/21
  • FREE

    CME: Pediatric Crohn’s disease: therapeutic updates and optimizing treatment

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that is defined by a transmural process that often occurs in the terminal ileum but may occur in any portion of the GI tract. Although the exact etiology of CD is unknown, a handful of genetic, immunological, and environmental risk factors have been identified. Research suggests that in genetically susceptible patients, there is an impaired immune response to commensal or pathogenic intestinal microbiota that drives mucosal inflammation. The incidence of pediatric CD (pCD) is increasing around the globe, varying between 2.5 to 11.4 per 100,000, with an estimated prevalence of 58 per 100,000. Approximately 25% of patients are diagnosed with IBD before the age of 18. Intestinal and abdominal complications such as strictures, abscesses, and fistulas are common among pediatric patients and increase as the disease progresses. IBD impairs attendance at school, and psychosocial ramifications in children diagnosed with IBD incdude a higher incidence of depression and anxiety.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe differences between European and American approaches to pCD
    • Identify the present nutritional and pharmacotherapeutic treatment options currently available for management of pCD and apply them to patient cases using evidence-based medicine
    • Identify new and emerging approaches to and therapies for the treatment of pCD
    • Evaluate a treatment plan for a specific patient based on severity of pCD to optimize safety and efficacy, suggesting modifications for improvement

    Target Audience:

    The following healthcare professionals: pediatricians and pediatric gastroenterologists; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with pCD.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 5/24/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 5/24/21
  • FREE

    CME: Gaucher disease: Updates from recent research findings

    Gaucher disease (GD) is characterized by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase, resulting in the accumulation of sphingolipids throughout the body but most manifesting prominently in the bones. GD is subcategorized based on clinical features: type 1 GD is the non-neuronopathic form and affects mainly the inner organs, while types 2 and 3 are the acute and sub-acute neuropathic forms, whose pathology manifests predominantly within central nervous system. GD impacts about 1 in 75,000 births, making it one of the most common lysosomal storage diseases. One of the first of GD’s complications is the chronic anemia and a persistent bleeding risk. Another is the hepatosplenomegaly, which may be a part of the initial clinical presentation, as may the anatomical abnormalities of bone deformities and stunted growth.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the pathogenesis, clinical presentations, complications, and epidemiology of Gaucher disease including updated recently presented material
    • Describe principles and problems regarding screening for and diagnosing Gaucher disease that can applied to patient cases
    • Describe emerging therapies for Gaucher disease based on research recently presented
    • Design and implement appropriate therapeutic plans for treatment of Gaucher disease based on research recently presented

    Target Audience:

    The following healthcare professionals: pediatricians, neurologists, endocrinologists, and primary care physicians; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who may clinically encounter patients with Gaucher disease.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 4/28/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 4/28/21