Free Pediatrics CME

  • FREE

    Free Pediatrics CME Courses from Pri-Med® – Designed for Primary Care Clinicians

    As a primary care clinician, you treat the whole family in many cases, so it’s important to stay up to date on topics you will encounter frequently with pediatric patients. Complete one of our free pediatric CME courses to learn practical clinical pearls you can use in your practice right away.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: Varies by Course
    • CME credits awarded by: pmiCME, the accredited division of Pri-Med®
    • Format: On-Demand Courses Online
    • Material last updated: Continuously Updated
    • Expiration of CME credit: Varies by Course
  • FREE

    The Current and Emerging Landscape of Pharmacotherapy for Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome (NRDS)

    Activity Description / Statement of Need:

    In this online, self-learning activity:

    Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) occurs in 10.1% of preterm infants born at 34 weeks’ gestational age (GA), corresponding to an over 40-fold increased risk as compared to their 39- to 40-week-GA counterparts. The risk decreases with increasing GA; at a GA of 37 weeks, the risk has fallen to just to just three times that of a full-term infants. Aside from premature birth, risk factors include: maternal gestational diabetes, male infant, and multiplets.

    Target Audience:

    The following healthcare professionals: neonatologists; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who clinically encounter neonatal patients with RSD.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Identify the pathophysiology, clinical features, and strategies for diagnosis of neonatal RDS
    • Review current and emerging options for the management of neonatal RDS
    • Develop pre- and postnatal treatment plans for the prevention and management of neonatal RDS
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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 12/5/2020
    • Expiration of CME credit: 12/5/2022
  • FREE

    Cystic fibrosis: Therapeutic updates and optimizing treatment

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease that affects nearly 70,000 people worldwide with more than 90% of patients diagnosed of Caucasian descent and a median lifetime survival remains a mere 43.6 years. CF is caused by an autosomal recessive mutation in the CF transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene, which controls the other chloride and sodium channels at the cell surface and is found in the lungs, liver, pancreas, intestine, sweat duct, and epididymis. The primary organs in which the disease manifests clinically are the pancreas, leading to malabsorption of nutrients, and the lungs due to the accumulation of thick, sticky mucous that contributes to airway obstruction. CF causes several clinical complications, including recurrent pulmonary infections, nasal polyps, CF-related diabetes, fat-soluble vitamin deficiencies, acid reflux, and liver failure.

    Target Audience:

    The following HCPs: pulmonologists, pediatricians, gastroenterologists and primary care physicians; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in the aforementioned areas of specialty; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with CF.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the pathophysiology of CF such that it might inform treatment mechanisms.
    • Identify the currently available and emerging pharmacotherapeutic treatments for the management of CF and apply them to patient cases using evidence-based medicine.
    • Describe newly approved and investigational therapies in development for CF.
    • Evaluate an ongoing treatment plan for a specific patient with CF to optimize safety and efficacy, suggesting modifications for improvement, including the management of complications.
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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 07/18/2020
    • Expiration of CME credit: 07/18/2022
  • FREE

    Hemophilia B: Optimizing Pharmacotherapeutic Management Strategies

    Hemophilia is a genetic disease caused by mutation of one of the genes for coagulation proteins leading to dangerous, uncontrolled bleeding. In hemophilia B, a mutation in the gene for factor IX (FIX) leads to an endogenous deficiency in the clotting factor. The incidence of hemophilia B is the same in all geographic regions, populations, and ethnic groups,affecting approximately 1 out of every 30,000 male births. The condition is diagnosed by measuring FIX activity, and patients with severe hemophilia have levels of 1% or less.

    Patients with severe hemophilia B are at risk for spontaneous, life-threatening bleeding episodes. Untreated, the life expectancy is approximately 20 years,and painful or even life-threatening morbidities include intracranial hemorrhage, severe bleeding in other organ systems, musculoskeletal injury, and joint injury. In contrast, in people with moderate or mild hemophilia, abnormal bleeding usually occurs after minor trauma or surgery.

    Physical therapy can ease symptoms if internal bleeding has damaged a patient’s joints, and surgery may be necessary if internal bleeding has caused severe damage. However, the current standard of therapy for hemophilia B is intravenous infusion of therapeutic factor concentrates. Through the reduction in the number of bleeding incidences and improvement in quality of life, factor replacement therapy has significantly reduced the morbidity and mortality of hemophilia. Furthermore, prophylactic therapy has the demonstrated benefit of reducing the development of hemophilic arthropathy.

    Target Audience:

    The following healthcare professionals: hematology, primary care physicians, and pediatricians; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in hematology as well as other Hemophilia Treatment Center HCPs; and any other clinicians with an interest in hemophilia B.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the risk factors and occurrence of hemophilia B.
    • Identify available prophylactic and treatment options for hemophilia B and apply them to a patient case.
    • Identify the new treatment options for hemophilia B.
    • Identify adherence barriers in and deliver effective treatment counseling to patients with hemophilia B.
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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 06/10/2020
    • Expiration of CME credit: 06/10/2022
  • FREE

    Hemophilia A: Optimizing Pharmacotherapeutic Management Strategies

    Hemophilia is a genetic disease caused by mutation of one of the genes for coagulation proteins leading to dangerous, uncontrolled bleeding. In hemophilia A, a mutation in the gene for factor VIII (FVIII) leads to an endogenous deficiency in the clotting factor. The incidence of hemophilia A is the same in all geographic regions, populations, and ethnic groups, affecting approximately 1 out of every 5000 male births. The condition is diagnosed by measuring FVIII activity, and patients with severe hemophilia have FVIII activity of 1% or less. Patients with severe hemophilia A are at risk for spontaneous, life-threatening bleeding episodes. Untreated, the life expectancy is approximately 20 years, and painful or even life-threatening morbidities include intracranial hemorrhage, severe bleeding in other organ systems, musculoskeletal injury, and joint injury. In contrast, in people with moderate or mild hemophilia, abnormal bleeding usually occurs after minor trauma or surgery.

    Target Audience:

    The following healthcare professionals: hematology, primary care physicians, and pediatricians; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in hematology as well as other Hemophilia Treatment Center HCPs; and any other clinicians with an interest in hemophilia A.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the risk factors and occurrence of hemophilia A.
    • Identify available prophylactic and treatment options for hemophilia A and apply them to a patient case.
    • Identify the new treatment options for hemophilia A.
    • Identify adherence barriers in and deliver effective treatment counseling to patients with hemophilia A.
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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 06/06/2020
    • Expiration of CME credit: 06/06/2022
  • FREE

    CME: Fabry disease: Updates from recent research findings

    Fabry disease is characterized by a deficiency of the glycoside hydrolase enzyme alpha galactosidase A, resulting in the accumulation of the glycolipid globotriaosylceramide throughout the body, particularly prominently in the blood vessels.

    After completing this course, physicians will better be able to:

    • Describe the pathogenesis, clinical presentations, complications, and epidemiology of Fabry disease including updated material presented at the 15th Annual WORLDSymposium
    • Describe principles and problems regarding screening for and diagnosing Fabry disease that can applied to patient cases
    • Describe emerging therapies for Fabry disease based on research presented at the 15th Annual WORLDSymposium
    • Design and implement appropriate therapeutic plans for treatment of Fabry disease based on research presented at the 15th Annual WORLDSymposium

    Target Audience: cardiologists, nephrologists, pediatricians, and primary care physicians; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who may clinically encounter patients with Fabry disease.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1.25
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 6/25/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 6/25/21
  • FREE

    Advances in Nursing Care for Pediatric Patients with High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    Advances in Nursing Care for Pediatric Patients with High-Risk Neuroblastoma consists of two presentations with discussion: Optimal Nursing Strategies to Manage Pediatric Patients with High-Risk Neuroblastoma and Recurrent/Refractory Disease of Pediatric Neuroblastoma: Enhancing the Role of the Nurse.

    At the conclusion of Advances in Nursing Care for Pediatric Patients with High-Risk Neuroblastoma, you will be able to:
    • Review the fundamentals of diagnosing, treating, and managing high-risk pediatric neuroblastoma
    • Examine strategies to improve supportive care for children with high-risk neuroblastoma
    • Examine the aspects of parental decision-making regarding appropriate care for children with recurrent/refractory neuroblastoma
    • Plan strategies to improve the dialogue and working relationship with parents/caregivers of pediatric patients regarding the goals of care through the treatment continuum and beyond

    Nursing Educational Objective:
    After completing Advances in Nursing Care for Pediatric Patients with High-Risk Neuroblastoma, you should be able to:
    • Provide appropriate care and counsel for patients and their families

    Target Audiences:
    This program is intended for pediatric oncology nurses, pediatric nurses, oncology nurses, nurse practitioners, nurse managers, infusion nurses, research nurses, physician assistants, and other health care providers who care for or have an interest in pediatric patients with high-risk neuroblastoma.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 2
    • CME credits awarded by: Postgraduate Institute for Medicine
    • Format: On-Demand Online, Online Video
    • Material last updated: September 29, 2017
    • Expiration of CME credit: September 29, 2018
  • FREE

    CME: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in Children and Adolescents: Updates from APA 2019

    ADHD is a common neuropsychiatric disorder, estimated to affect 7.2% of school age children worldwide and 11% in the US. The presence of the disorder is often not detectable until school workload increases, and it has a significant impact on child and adolescent development, health, education, and family situations. There is evidence of a wide variability in clinicians’ ability to diagnose ADHD, suggesting opportunities for improvement and a gap in care that might be remedied by CME.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Summarize the most impactful findings presented at the APA 2019 meeting relating to pediatric ADHD related to disease diagnosis and apply them to patient cases.
    • Summarize the most impactful findings presented at the APA 2019 meeting relating to pediatric ADHD related to evaluation of degree therapeutic success and apply them to patient cases.
    • Summarize the most impactful findings presented at the APA 2019 meeting relating to pediatric ADHD related to emerging therapies and apply them to patient cases.
    • Summarize the most impactful findings presented at the APA 2019 meeting relating to pediatric ADHD related to quantifying benefit and risk of disease progression and apply them to patient cases.

    Target Audience:

    The following healthcare professionals: psychiatrists, primary care physicians, pediatricians; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in psychiatry; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter pediatric patients with ADHD.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 10/6/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 10/6/21
  • FREE

    CME: Updates in vaccine-preventable diseases: meningococcal meningitis

    Meningococcal disease is a potentially severe bacterial infection caused by Neisseria meningitidis that may lead to serious sequelae and death in some even with appropriate treatment. N. meningitidis is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis and sepsis in the United States. Since the peak of the disease in the late 1990s, the incidence has declined annually and was at historic low rate of 0.11 per 100,000 population (349 cases) in the year 2017. Among the identified bacterial serogroups, B, C, and Y cause the majority of cases in the United States. Sixty percent of cases among patients 0-59 months and 50% of cases among 17-23 years of age are caused by serogroup B. Seventy-three percent of all cases among eleven year old or more are caused by serogroups C, W, or Y.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Recall epidemiology, clinical features, and complications of meningococcal meningitis
    • Recognize high-risk groups (e.g., 16-23 years of age) and describe the importance of immunizing them
    • Describe present meningococcal vaccination recommendations, and apply them to patient cases
    • Describe the importance of vaccine series completion to patients in the prevention of invasive meningococcal disease caused by various serotypes
    • Formulate an approaches to engaging with adolescents and young adults regarding meningococcal vaccination

    Target Audience:

    The following HCPs: primary care physicians, pediatricians, and public health professionals; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in family medicine; and any other clinicians with an interest in or who commonly encounter patients eligible for vaccination against meningococcal disease.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 9/24/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 9/24/21
  • FREE

    CME: The problem with vaccines: public hesitancy and refusal

    Universal vaccination is one of the most important public health initiatives of the last century. The rates of vaccine-preventable illnesses have dropped precipitously with each introduction of an effective vaccine. Vaccinations not only protect the public against specific infectious diseases but also reduce future consequences, sequelae, and complications of disease, such as in the cases of: human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine and cancer; rotavirus vaccine and type 1 diabetes; and the measles vaccine and all-cause mortality. Among people born between 1994 and 2013, vaccination is responsible for the prevention of 322 million illnesses, 21 million hospitalizations, and 732,000 deaths, resulting in a savings of nearly $1.7 trillion in total costs. Extrapolating these predictions across all generations, the benefits of universal vaccination are considerable. Despite the many benefits of vaccination and the relatively low risks, vaccine hesitancy is a growing concern among health care professionals and has led to the resurgence of vaccine-preventable illnesses in pockets of the United States.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe common barriers to adherence to recommended vaccination schedules
    • Discuss ways in which to provide strong recommendations for vaccinations while dispelling myths among patients and caregivers
    • Describe vaccination benefits and risks with patients using techniques that have been shown to improve patient satisfaction and vaccine uptake
    • Explain methods to improve vaccination adherence, and implement strategies to improve accessibility, simplify vaccination schedules, and maximize the opportunities for vaccination

    Target Audience:

    The following HCPs: primary care physicians, pediatricians, and public health professionals; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in adult internal medicine and pediatrics; and any other clinicians who commonly encounter patients eligible for protection against vaccine-preventable diseases.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 9/16/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 9/16/21