Free Psychiatry CME

  • FREE

    Bipolar and mood disorder: Therapeutic updates and best practices

    In this online CME self-learning activity: Bipolar disorder is a mood disorder characterized by episodes of mania, hypomania, and depression. It affects 3-4% of the U.S. population, represents a substantial societal and economic burden in the United States, is also found to be strongly associated with other major public health concerns like diabetes and cardiovascular disease as well as suicide.

    The literature demonstrates that medication nonadherence is a major issue among patients with bipolar disorder. Nonadherence affects approximately 60% of patients and can result in hospitalization, poor effectiveness, increased relapses, and increased risk of morbidity. Other factors, such as patient perceptions, illness severity, and the relationship between the physician and patient, come into play and should be taken into account to optimize adherence.

    Target Audience: Healthcare professionals specializing in: family medicine, internal medicine, mental health, neurology and psychiatry, or those who otherwise commonly care for patients with bipolar or related psychiatric diseases.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Identify current and emerging treatment modalities for the management of bipolar disorder and apply them to patient cases using evidence-based medicine.
    • Evaluate a specific patient during the maintenance phase of therapy and suggest modifications for improvement, taking into account: Efficacy; changes in symptoms; adverse effects of therapy; and impact on quality of life.
    • Describe the challenges associated with treating patients with bipolar disorder, including medication adherence and adverse effects, such as weight gain.
    • Recall the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder as it relates to the mechanisms of action of available and emerging pharmacotherapies.
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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 09/11/2020
    • Expiration of CME credit: 09/11/2022
  • FREE

    Updates in alcohol use disorder (AUD) pharmacotherapy and barriers to optimal care

    In this online CME self-learning program: Alcohol use disorder (AUD), referred to colloquially as alcoholism, is an integration of past terms that have include in past as alcohol dependence or abuse, and may be marked by any one of a number of different symptoms or behaviors that include physical cravings, compulsion, guilt, and frequent consumption over an extended period of time. A quarter of adults report at least one day of heavy drinking over the past year. Alcohol accounts for over 687,000 emergency department visits in the U.S. by people under age 20 per year; worldwide, 76.3 million people are estimated to have AUDs, and they account for an annual mortality rate of 1.8 million. AUD is largely under-recognized and undertreated, constituting one gap in care and justifying continuing HCP education. HCPs are considered well-positioned to be able to recognize AUD, and one of the first missed opportunities to do so is failing to employ a validated screening tool, which might identify a condition well before it reaches the full scale of its adverse psychosocial potential.

    Target Audience:

    HCPs who are: psychiatrists, primary care physicians, emergency medicine physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, and those who otherwise commonly treat patients suffering from or have a clinical interest in AUD.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the common clinical presentation(s) of AUD.
    • Recall recommended AUD diagnostic criteria, and apply them to a patient case.
    • List current treatment options for AUD, including behavioral and pharmacologic therapies and apply them to patient cases using evidence-based medicine.
    • Describe challenges to the successful management of AUD relating to treatment adherence.
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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 09/25/2020
    • Expiration of CME credit: 09/25/2022
  • FREE

    Free Psychiatry CME Courses from Pri-Med® – Designed for Primary Care Clinicians

    Individuals with depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, and other psychiatric conditions first seek help from primary care providers like you. Our courses offer practical guidance on assessing and managing these can’t-miss diagnoses in your patients. Choose from a variety of free psychiatry CME courses to improve care for your patients. Earn credits at no cost today.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: Varies by Course
    • CME credits awarded by: pmiCME, the accredited division of Pri-Med®
    • Format: On-Demand Courses Online
    • Material last updated: Continuously Updated
    • Expiration of CME credit: Varies by Course
  • FREE

    Fact or Fiction? Test Your Knowledge on Residual and Treatment-Emergent Symptoms in Major Depressive Disorder

    Although major depressive disorder (MDD) has a profound impact on individuals, families, and society, it remains undertreated. There are currently more than 4 million US adults who are inadequately treated for MDD. Numerous studies show that antidepressant therapies are superior to placebo, but most adults with MDD do not achieve an adequate response with first-line pharmacotherapy. Inadequate response to antidepressant therapy is associated with greater medical morbidity, more hospitalizations, decreased productivity, and more suicide attempts. Treatment of MDD should strive for return to premorbid status and full functional and cognitive recovery. However, survey data show that health care providers may lack confidence in the management of patients who have an inadequate response to an antidepressant. The major barriers to achieving full recovery are the continuation of residual symptoms and treatment-emergent symptoms associated with antidepressants. Even in those responding to antidepressants, residual and treatment-emergent symptoms such as weight gain, sleep disturbance, and sexual dysfunction can impede adherence and recovery. Additionally, poor cognitive functioning is an obstacle to remission. Although tools are available for the evaluation and monitoring of cognitive function in patients with MDD, they remain underutilized. In this enduring activity, expert faculty will provide opportunities to enhance knowledge and competence in the ability to differentiate residual and treatment-emergent symptoms and better assess and manage symptoms using evidence-based strategies to optimize available therapies.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: Medical Education Resources
    • Format: On-Demand Online
  • FREE

    Fact or Fiction? Test Your Knowledge on Assessment and Management Strategies in Tardive Dyskinesia

    At any given time, roughly one-quarter of individuals taking antipsychotics experience TD, a condition characterized by involuntary movements of the face and body. Moreover, as the use of antipsychotics has expanded to disorders such as depression, behavioral disorders, and dementia, TD is no longer primarily limited to patients with schizophrenia. TD has an outsized impact on patients’ ability to carry out daily tasks and interact with others. However, because TD has long been considered an irreversible consequence of the use of antipsychotics or other dopamine receptor–blocking agents, many clinicians have come to view it with a sort of “therapeutic nihilism.” As a result, many patients have not received treatment for their TD. Recently, the US FDA approved 2 medications, both vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) inhibitors, to treat TD, giving patients access to the first well-tolerated oral treatments shown to be effective for this condition. To ensure that patients receive maximum benefit from this advance in TD treatment, clinicians must learn how to integrate VMAT2 inhibitors into their practice. In this activity, an expert faculty member will dispel common myths about TD, educating clinicians about how to recognize and diagnose TD promptly, how VMAT2 inhibitors work to improve TD symptoms, how the 2 approved agents differ, and how VMAT2 inhibitors can be used alongside other strategies to improve outcomes for patients with TD.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1.5
    • CME credits awarded by: Medical Education Resources
    • Format: On-Demand Online
  • FREE

    One Size Does Not Fit All: Optimizing Use of Major Depressive Disorder Specifiers to Improve Outcomes

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a highly heterogeneous disorder that is increasingly seen as a continuum, with emphasis on overlapping and subthreshold symptoms. To address this issue, the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) included the use of specifiers, such as mixed features and anxious distress, with the diagnosis of MDD. Although DSM-5 specifiers improve utility and precision in the diagnosis of MDD and related disorders, they may not be widely adopted because some clinicians maintain a categorical approach toward depression. The risk when clinicians avoid specifiers is significant because patients with diverse depressive illnesses should be diagnosed, monitored, and treated differently. Further, compared with MDD alone, the presence of mixed features or anxious distress in patients with MDD may be associated with diminished response to antidepressants, more severe symptoms, increased hospitalization, greater risk for suicide, and other deleterious outcomes. It is important for health care providers to appreciate the importance of MDD specifiers, their diagnostic criteria, and implications for evidence-based treatment. This activity was created to enhance knowledge and competence of health care providers who evaluate and manage patients with depression and clinical features of hypomania, mania, or anxiety.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1.5
    • CME credits awarded by: Medical Education Resources
    • Format: On demand online
  • FREE

    ScientiaCME Neuropsychiatry – Psychiatry

    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 2
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Expiration of CME credit: Two years after release
  • FREE

    Binge Eating Disorder (BED): Therapeutic Updates, Best Practices, and Barriers to Care

    This free online CME self-learning program provides deep insights into Binge Eating Disorder (BED) and features commentary from experts on the topic.

    Topics covered in this program include

    • BED epidemiology
    • BED comorbidities
    • BED treatment
    • BED diagnosis

    After completing this course, you will better be able to:

    • Describe the importance of accurate diagnosis and treatment of BED.
    • Determine likelihood of BED using established methods in a patient case.
    • Describe available therapies used for treatment of BED and summarize* recent literature supporting use of those therapies
    • Design a therapeutic regimen, including pharmacotherapy, for the treatment of BED
    • Describe barriers preventing the optimal treatment of BED

    Target Audience: Psychiatrists and primary care physicians; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in psychiatry; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with BED.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: September 04, 2018
    • Expiration of CME credit: September 04, 2021
  • FREE

    CME: Improving the treatment and management of schizophrenia: an overview of current and novel approaches

    Schizophrenia, by nature, presents manifold challenges to the HCP directing neuropsychiatric care. Not only do practical matters like medication adherence play a role in the success of therapy, but it behooves clinicians to also have a well-informed understanding of the symptomatology and treatment course of the disease. Atypical antipsychotics are the mainstay of initial pharmacotherapy, with oral agents being preferred first. However, they have sometimes been associated with poor patient adherence, which is associated with suboptimal clinical outcomes. In contrast, improving adherence may enhance quality of life and reduce the risk of hospitalization, thereby potentially lowering health resource utilization and its associated costs.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and the role the neurotransmitters receptors play in it: D2, D3, 5-HT2A
    • Describe the benefits and risks of pharmacotherapy for schizophrenia and take them into account when formulating a treatment plan for different patients
    • Formulate a treatment plan for a variety of patients with schizophrenia, including those exhibiting only negative symptoms
    • Recommend therapy changes in patients who are unable to tolerate a prescribed treatment
    • Identify barriers to care in patients with schizophrenia and develop** strategies to abate them

    Target Audience:

    Healthcare professionals who are: psychiatrists and primary care physicians; nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurses, and pharmacists who specialize in psychiatry; and those who otherwise commonly care for or clinically encounter patients who have schizophrenia.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 3/6/2020
    • Expiration of CME credit: 3/6/2022
  • FREE

    CME: Opioid dependence and opioid use disorder: best practices, barriers in care, and the role of long-acting injectable medication

    Opioid use disorder (OUD) affects millions of individuals globally and is best defined by the Diagnostic and Statistic Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) as a condition due to tolerance, manifestation of physical dependence, and loss of control leading to health hazards.The scale of the problem is staggering, and while the causes are manifold, it is fueled in part by widespread availability: the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that the distribution of prescription opioid analgesics rose over fivefold between 1997 and 2007.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the epidemiology of OUD and dependence, and outline current and the significance of inappropriate selection and treatment of opioid therapy
    • Identify long-acting treatment modalities for OUD and dependence, and apply them to patient cases using evidence-based medicine
    • Identify challenges associated with the selection and implementation of drug regimens to the treatment of OUD and dependence, including risk factors for opioid overdose
    • Develop strategies for recognizing and improving therapeutic adherence in patients treated for OUD and opioid dependence

    Target Audience:

    Healthcare professionals specializing in: addiction specialists, pain management specialists, primary care physicians, and psychiatrists; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in pain management or substance abuse; and any other health professionals who encounter OUD in the clinical setting.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 12/30/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 12/30/21