Free Critical Care Medicine CME

  • FREE

    CME: Hemodynamics – Where are We Now?

    Goal-directed therapy (GDT) has been taken as the gospel in critical care since the publication of Rivers et al.’s seminal paper on the topic demonstrating a mortality benefit in patients with severe sepsis and related shock back in late 2001, whose protocols were soon embraced and became ensconced in practice as standards of care, overlapping with other, high-acuity areas of medical specialty like surgery and emergency medicine. However, these initially results later became more mixed and equivocal on the whole when balanced in the context of more recent literature.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the present methods of fluid assessment
    • Describe the present methods of hemodynamic monitoring
    • Given patient cases, reason your approach to fluid management under various clinical circumstances

    Target Audience:

    This program has been designed for a multidisciplinary physician and nurse audience including: ICU / Anesthesia / Peri-op / Intensivists / Trauma / Critical Care

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 12/9/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 12/9/21
  • FREE

    CME: New Trends in Hemodynamics: Dynamic Assessments

    Goal-directed therapy (GDT) has been taken as the gospel in critical care since the publication of Rivers et al.’s seminal paper on the topic demonstrating a mortality benefit in patients with severe sepsis and related shock back in late 2001, whose protocols were soon embraced and became ensconced in practice as standards of care, overlapping with other, high-acuity areas of medical specialty like surgery and emergency medicine. However, these initially results later became more mixed and equivocal on the whole when balanced in the context of more recent literature.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the risks of over- and under-resuscitation
    • Describe the present methods of fluid assessment
    • Describe the present methods of hemodynamic monitoring
    • Given patient cases, reason your approach to fluid management under various clinical circumstances

    Target Audience:

    This program has been designed for a multidisciplinary physician and nurse audience including: ICU / Anesthesia / Peri-op / Intensivists / Trauma / Critical Care

    See full details chevron_right
    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 12/9/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 12/9/21
  • FREE

    CME: Applications in Hemodynamics – Taking Us from Here to the Future: Clinical Applications

    Goal-directed therapy (GDT) has been taken as the gospel in critical care since the publication of Rivers et al.’s seminal paper on the topic demonstrating a mortality benefit in patients with severe sepsis and related shock back in late 2001, whose protocols were soon embraced and became ensconced in practice as standards of care, overlapping with other, high-acuity areas of medical specialty like surgery and emergency medicine. However, these initially results later became more mixed and equivocal on the whole when balanced in the context of more recent literature.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Given patient cases, reason your approach to fluid management under various clinical circumstances
    • Given patient cases, balance volume with vasoactive therapy in your hemodynamic stewardship of the patient

    Target Audience:

    This program has been designed for a multidisciplinary physician and nurse audience including: ICU / Anesthesia / Peri-op / Intensivists / Trauma / Critical Care

    See full details chevron_right
    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 12/9/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 12/9/21