Free Hematology CME

  • FREE

    CME: von Willebrand’s Disease (vWB): Therapeutic Updates and Optimizing Treatment

    In this online, self-learning activity:

    Von Willebrand disease (vWD) is the most common congenital bleeding disorder worldwide. Affecting both male and female births in equal number, vWD is caused by a deficiency or defect in the von Willebrand factor (vWF) glycoprotein, which is responsible for mediating platelet and coagulation factor VIII function. vWD types 1 and 3 are caused by quantitative deficiencies in vWF. In contrast, type 2 vWD is caused by a qualitative defect in the production of vWF. Type 1 is the most common type of vWD, accounting for 60% to 70% of cases, followed by type 2, which is diagnosed in 25% to 30% of patients. Type 3 vWD, the rarest form, affects about 1 in 1,000,000 people. There is evidence that the use of factor VIII/vWF concentrates should be individualized, but no recent vWD guidelines address this issue. Although DDAVP is the treatment of choice for most type 1 vWD patients, data do not support the use of DDAVP for type 2B vWD owing in part to an increased risk for thrombocytopenia. Another practice gap is a lack of guidance around the appropriate ages at which patients with severe vWD are optimally initiated on vWF prophylaxis. Furthermore, although DDAVP is not contraindicated in pregnancy, 31% of physicians consider DDAVP a contraindication according to the results of one survey, illustrating a present area of controversy in practice.

    Target Audience:

    The following healthcare professionals: Hematologists and primary care physicians; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and pharmacists who practice in hematology; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with vWD.

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    • Cost: Free
    • CME credits awarded by: 1
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: March 07, 2021
    • Expiration of CME credit: March 07, 2023
  • FREE

    Virtual Tumor Board: Diagnosis and Management of Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    In this virtual tumor board, David P. Steensma, MD, FACP, Reza Nejati, MD, and Ilene Galinsky, BSN, MSN, ANP-C, discuss patient and tumor characteristics that inform personalized care plans, risk stratification, and supportive care strategies for patients with MDS.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: i3 Health in partnership with Anaplastic Anemia & Myelodysplastic Syndromes International Foundation
    • Format: Online, On Demand
  • FREE

    Update on Therapeutic Advances in T-Cell Lymphoma

    Join Steven M. Horwitz, MD, Member and Attending Physician at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, as he discusses guideline recommendations for differential diagnosis of TCL, novel treatment strategies, and best practices for managing side effects in this case-based live webinar series! Register today!

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: i3 Health
    • Format: Webinar
  • FREE

    Congenital Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (CTTP): Updates from the American Society of Hematology (ASH) 2019 annual meeting

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare blood disorder that impacts three in a million adults per year, with congenital or hereditary TTP (cTTP, also known as Upshaw-Schulman syndrome) accounting for a third of the overall incidence. The incidence of TTP rises with increasing age and the mortality rate of untreated TTP may be as high as 90%.

    In recent years molecular mechanisms contributing to TTP have been identified: patients diagnosed with TTP have larger von Willebrand factor molecules (vWF) and a defective protease enzyme of A Disintegrinlike And Metalloprotease with ThromboSpondin type 1 motif 13 (ADAMTS13), which cleaves larger vWF molecules and inhibits platelet adhesion. In congenital or hereditary TTP (cTTP, also known as Upshaw-Schulman syndrome), the gene that codes of ADAMTS13 is defective and cannot properly produce the enzyme, whereas in acquired TTP, antibody production leads to downstream enzymatic deactivation.

    Target Audience:
    The following healthcare professionals: hematologists; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in hematology; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with cTTP.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Summarize the most impactful findings presented at the ASH 2019 annual meeting relating to congenital TTP
    • Recall the pathophysiology of congenital TTP
    • Describe the clinical manifestations and methods of establishing a diagnosis of cTTP, and apply that information to a patient case
    • List treatment strategies for cTTP, and apply that information to a patient case
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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: .75
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 08/30/2020
    • Expiration of CME credit: 08/30/2022
  • FREE

    Treating Oncology Patients During COVID-19

    Activity Description / Statement of Need: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to unprecedented changes in health care delivery worldwide, affecting the way that nearly every medical specialty can safely practice. As with other fields of medicine, oncology has its own challenges in navigating the pandemic. Based on pre-pandemic estimates, 1.8 million new cancer diagnoses would be expected in 2020, equating to approximately 5,000 new cancer diagnoses per day. Evidence thus far suggests that COVID-19 is associated with significantly more complications and a higher risk of death in patients with cancer or with a history of cancer. Furthermore, patients with cancer have also been shown to have a higher COVID-19 infection rate than the general population, suggesting increased susceptibility, potentially due to immunosuppression, comorbidities, or poor health status related to cancer or its treatment. Based on these data, oncology specialists are said to be fighting “a war on two fronts” by balancing the risks of COVID-19 transmission and acquisition with the risks of delayed cancer diagnosis and treatment. This represents an unmet need among oncology practitioners as they navigate this new health care landscape.

    Target Audience:

    Healthcare professionals, including medical oncologists; radiation oncologists; surgical oncologists; surgeons; radiologists; nuclear medicine specialists; nurse practitioners and physician assistants who practice in oncology; and other healthcare providers who manage cancer.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Recall the symptoms of COVID-19 infection and best practices for screening patients, health care providers, and staff in the oncology setting.
    • Develop a plan to provide oncology care in the setting of the COVID-19 pandemic.
    • Describe the risks of delaying cancer diagnosis and treatment against the risk of COVID-19 exposure and infection.
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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: .75
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 09/22/2020
    • Expiration of CME credit: 09/22/2022
  • FREE

    Hemophilia B: Optimizing Pharmacotherapeutic Management Strategies

    Hemophilia is a genetic disease caused by mutation of one of the genes for coagulation proteins leading to dangerous, uncontrolled bleeding. In hemophilia B, a mutation in the gene for factor IX (FIX) leads to an endogenous deficiency in the clotting factor. The incidence of hemophilia B is the same in all geographic regions, populations, and ethnic groups,affecting approximately 1 out of every 30,000 male births. The condition is diagnosed by measuring FIX activity, and patients with severe hemophilia have levels of 1% or less.

    Patients with severe hemophilia B are at risk for spontaneous, life-threatening bleeding episodes. Untreated, the life expectancy is approximately 20 years,and painful or even life-threatening morbidities include intracranial hemorrhage, severe bleeding in other organ systems, musculoskeletal injury, and joint injury. In contrast, in people with moderate or mild hemophilia, abnormal bleeding usually occurs after minor trauma or surgery.

    Physical therapy can ease symptoms if internal bleeding has damaged a patient’s joints, and surgery may be necessary if internal bleeding has caused severe damage. However, the current standard of therapy for hemophilia B is intravenous infusion of therapeutic factor concentrates. Through the reduction in the number of bleeding incidences and improvement in quality of life, factor replacement therapy has significantly reduced the morbidity and mortality of hemophilia. Furthermore, prophylactic therapy has the demonstrated benefit of reducing the development of hemophilic arthropathy.

    Target Audience:

    The following healthcare professionals: hematology, primary care physicians, and pediatricians; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in hematology as well as other Hemophilia Treatment Center HCPs; and any other clinicians with an interest in hemophilia B.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the risk factors and occurrence of hemophilia B.
    • Identify available prophylactic and treatment options for hemophilia B and apply them to a patient case.
    • Identify the new treatment options for hemophilia B.
    • Identify adherence barriers in and deliver effective treatment counseling to patients with hemophilia B.
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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 06/10/2020
    • Expiration of CME credit: 06/10/2022
  • FREE

    Hemophilia A: Optimizing Pharmacotherapeutic Management Strategies

    Hemophilia is a genetic disease caused by mutation of one of the genes for coagulation proteins leading to dangerous, uncontrolled bleeding. In hemophilia A, a mutation in the gene for factor VIII (FVIII) leads to an endogenous deficiency in the clotting factor. The incidence of hemophilia A is the same in all geographic regions, populations, and ethnic groups, affecting approximately 1 out of every 5000 male births. The condition is diagnosed by measuring FVIII activity, and patients with severe hemophilia have FVIII activity of 1% or less. Patients with severe hemophilia A are at risk for spontaneous, life-threatening bleeding episodes. Untreated, the life expectancy is approximately 20 years, and painful or even life-threatening morbidities include intracranial hemorrhage, severe bleeding in other organ systems, musculoskeletal injury, and joint injury. In contrast, in people with moderate or mild hemophilia, abnormal bleeding usually occurs after minor trauma or surgery.

    Target Audience:

    The following healthcare professionals: hematology, primary care physicians, and pediatricians; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in hematology as well as other Hemophilia Treatment Center HCPs; and any other clinicians with an interest in hemophilia A.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the risk factors and occurrence of hemophilia A.
    • Identify available prophylactic and treatment options for hemophilia A and apply them to a patient case.
    • Identify the new treatment options for hemophilia A.
    • Identify adherence barriers in and deliver effective treatment counseling to patients with hemophilia A.
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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 06/06/2020
    • Expiration of CME credit: 06/06/2022
  • FREE

    Multiple Myeloma (MM): Updates from 23rd Annual Congress of EHA (EHA 2018)

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematologic malignancy of the lymphocytes. All cases are marked by monoclonal gammopathy, and while the true cause is unknown, associated factors are thought to include: radiation, genetics, viral infections, and the human immunodeficiency virus.

    After completing Multiple Myeloma (MM): Updates from 23rd Annual Congress of EHA (EHA 2018) physicians will better be able to:

    • Summarize the most impactful findings presented at EHA 2018 meeting relating to initial treatment of transplant eligible and ineligible myeloma
    • Summarize the most impactful findings presented at EHA 2018 meeting relating to role of autologous stem cell transplant
    • Summarize the most impactful findings presented at EHA 2018 meeting relating to current role of monoclonal antibodies
    • Summarize the most impactful findings presented at EHA 2018 meeting relating to novel immune therapies

    Target Audience: hematologists and oncologists; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in oncology; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with MM.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 0.75
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: April 15, 2019
    • Expiration of CME credit: April 15, 2021
  • FREE

    Hemophilia A: Updates from 2018 American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting (ASH 2018)

    Hemophilia is a genetic disease caused by mutation of one of the genes for coagulation proteins leading to dangerous, uncontrolled bleeding.

    After completing Hemophilia A: Updates from 2018 American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting (ASH 2018) physicians will better be able to:

    • Describe the limitations of annual bleed rate as an epidemiological measure in Hemophilia A
    • Define early prophylaxis in severe hemophilia A and describe its impact on osteochondral damage
    • List evidence-supported benefits of extending clotting factor half lives
    • Summarize the most impactful findings presented at ASH 2018 meeting relating to prophylactic and therapeutic agents to treat hemophilia A, and apply them to patient cases
    • Describe the emerging therapies in the treatment of hemophilia A

     

    Target Audience:

    hematologists; primary care physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in hematology; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with Hemophilia A.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: March 04, 2019
    • Expiration of CME credit: March 04, 2021