Free Infectious Medicine CME

  • FREE

    CME: HIV Prevention: The Role of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (HIV-PrEP)

    The development of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has had a dramatic impact on HIV-related morbidity and mortality. The use of ART in HIV-infected patients has been the core strategy to not only treat HIV but also prevent vertical HIV transmission. Antiretrovirals can be used for HIV prevention in patients who are not HIV-infected but are repeatedly exposed to HIV in a strategy termed pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Although the rationale for PrEP stems from successful HIV prevention in HIV exposed infants with the use of ART during labor, early post-partum period, and throughout breastfeeding, it has more recently applied to been applied to sexual transmission (e.g., people with multiple partners or HIV serodiscordant couples) and people who inject drugs illicitly with support from the literature. Because much of what comprises evidence and guidelines supporting PrEP has been published relatively recently and because healthcare professionals are oftentimes unable to keep up with the steady publishing of literature and evolution of clinical practice in a timely manner, continuing healthcare education activities in this area are warranted.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Define the role of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) including identification of high-risk patient populations for appropriate use
    • Analyze the data that support the use of PrEP for the prevention of HIV infection and apply it to patient cases
    • Assess the safety and efficacy of PrEP in the context of the medical literature and apply that knowledge to patient cases
    • Describe recommendations for PrEP use and the limitations to PrEP, and apply them to patient cases
    • Recall the economic impact of the widespread use of PrEP including benefits and limitations

    Target Audience: The following healthcare professionals: infectious disease specialists, primary care physicians, and public health; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in infectious disease; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter HIV.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 9/23/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 9/23/21
  • FREE

    CME: The problem with vaccines: public hesitancy and refusal

    Universal vaccination is one of the most important public health initiatives of the last century. The rates of vaccine-preventable illnesses have dropped precipitously with each introduction of an effective vaccine. Vaccinations not only protect the public against specific infectious diseases but also reduce future consequences, sequelae, and complications of disease, such as in the cases of: human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine and cancer; rotavirus vaccine and type 1 diabetes; and the measles vaccine and all-cause mortality. Among people born between 1994 and 2013, vaccination is responsible for the prevention of 322 million illnesses, 21 million hospitalizations, and 732,000 deaths, resulting in a savings of nearly $1.7 trillion in total costs. Extrapolating these predictions across all generations, the benefits of universal vaccination are considerable. Despite the many benefits of vaccination and the relatively low risks, vaccine hesitancy is a growing concern among health care professionals and has led to the resurgence of vaccine-preventable illnesses in pockets of the United States.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe common barriers to adherence to recommended vaccination schedules
    • Discuss ways in which to provide strong recommendations for vaccinations while dispelling myths among patients and caregivers
    • Describe vaccination benefits and risks with patients using techniques that have been shown to improve patient satisfaction and vaccine uptake
    • Explain methods to improve vaccination adherence, and implement strategies to improve accessibility, simplify vaccination schedules, and maximize the opportunities for vaccination

    Target Audience:

    The following HCPs: primary care physicians, pediatricians, and public health professionals; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in adult internal medicine and pediatrics; and any other clinicians who commonly encounter patients eligible for protection against vaccine-preventable diseases.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 9/16/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 9/16/21
  • FREE

    CME: Prevention and management of influenza infection

    Influenza has been recognized as a global public health menace since at least 100 years ago with the 1918-19 pandemic, which infected an estimated one-third of the world’s population and was responsible for the deaths of one in ten, or 50 million, of those infected. While some have contended that a significant number of deaths associated with the 1918 pandemic may have actually been attributable to acid-base derangements and pulmonary edema associated with contemporary aspirin dosing in the toxic range of two to eight times what is presently the maximum recommended dose – it remains a significant public health concern, with the 2017-2018 flu season in recent decades with an estimated 80,000 deaths (typical range 12,000-56,000 per year),coming with an annual cost of $16 billion.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Determine the impact of influenza infection
    • Describe influenza vaccination recommendations and apply them to patient cases
    • Describe treatment recommendations and apply them to patient cases
    • Describe present challenges to the prevention and treatment of influenza and develop strategies to combat them

    Target Audience:

    Healthcare professionals specializing in: infectious disease, internal medicine, and pediatrics; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who specialize in the aforementioned areas; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with influenza.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 7/23/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 7/23/21