Free Infectious Medicine CME

  • FREE

    Healio Free Infectious Disease CME

    Find out what over 50,000 of your colleagues already know. Earn credits faster and easier with Healio CME.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: Varies
  • FREE

    ScientiaCME Infectious Disease

    Target Audience: Physicians focusing on Infectious Diseases. 

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 3
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Expiration of CME credit: Two years after release
  • FREE

    PILOTforPulmonary.org: COVID-19 and Monoclonal Antibodies

    Designed for pulmonologists, infectious disease specialists, primary care physicians, nurse practitioners, PAs, and other health care providers who treat patients with COVID-19 and want to enhance their knowledge of monoclonal antibodies, this highly interactive learning activity features animations, faculty videos, downloadable resources, and more.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: The France Foundation is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
    • Format: Interacitve, Self-Directed, Animations, Videos, Slides
  • FREE

    PILOTforPulmonary.org: EXPLORE Learning Experience: Understanding and Managing NTM-Lung Disease

    This EXPLORE module is intended for health care providers who may be involved in the management of patients with NTM-lung disease. It covers the diagnosis, treatment and patient management of NTM/Mac lung disease.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: The France Foundation is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
    • Format: Interacitve, Self-Directed, Animations, Videos, Slides
  • FREE

    The difficulty with (C.) difficile: guideline updates and optimal identification and treatment strategies

    Activity Description / Statement of Need:

    Clostridioides difficile (formerly known as Clostridium difficile) is a gram-positive obligate anaerobe that produces exotoxins in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract resulting in watery, loose stool, abdominal pain, and nausea. The U.S. incidence of Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) is about half a million people, with 28% community-acquired, 37% healthcare-associated, and 36% associated with long-term care facilities. Additionally, CDI has incurred one billion dollars in costs to the U.S. healthcare system. Antibiotic exposure causes changes to the GI microflora and increases the risk of developing CDI, which is especially seen in carbapenems, third-/fourth- generation cephalosporins, clindamycin, and fluoroquinolone use. Other risk factors include acid suppressive therapy; age; prolonged hospitalizations or other recent healthcare exposure; recent tube feeding or GI surgery; and immunocompromised states, including recent chemotherapy.

    Target Audience:

    HCPs including: infectious diseases physicians, gastroenterologists, hospitalists, and intensivists; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and pharmacists who practice in the aforementioned areas of specialty; and any other HCPs with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with CDI. 

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 02/04/2022
    • Expiration of CME credit: 02/04/2024
  • FREE

    Vaccine hesitancy and denial: A problem for the ages coming into sharp focus during the pandemic

    Activity Description / Statement of Need:

    In this online, self-learning activity:

    The WHO defines vaccine hesitancy (VH) as a “delay in acceptance or refusal of vaccines despite the availability of vaccination services.” Despite substantial progress in rates of routine immunization over the decades prior to the most recent one, more recent trends suggest that immunization rates are beginning to plateau. Beyond VH and skepticism, there is also the embrace of outright vaccine rejection or denial fostered by the presence disinformation on conventional and social media platforms including claims that vacines are unsafe or unnecessary. Recent outbreaks of largely eradicated diseases such as measles, mumps, and diphtheria suggest that herd immunity may have suffered, putting those ineligible for vaccination at additional risk of infection. These developments have been attributed in part to VH and denial.

    One large group with increasing VH is parents. A 2019 national survey found that approximately 1 in 4 parents reported serious concerns towards vaccinating their children. Another study saw that in up to 35% parents of well-vaccinated children demonstrate VH. Parents may raise issues that many providers feel ill-equipped to answer, due to lack of thorough knowledge of all vaccines or lack of evidence-based communication strategies. Unfortunately, only few evidence-based strategies exist to guide providers in their discussions with vaccine-hesitant parents.

    Providers play a crucial role in vaccinating populations, but it is not and should not be their sole responsibility. Clinical practice sites, community organizations, health organizations, and government all contribute to addressing VH. Understanding potential solutions outside the office, such as media campaigns and policy changes, also provide insight into vaccine hesitancy and potential directions for future use.

    Target Audience:

    The following HCPs: Primary care physicians, pediatricians, and public health professionals; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in adult internal medicine and pediatrics; and any other clinicians who commonly encounter patients eligible for protection against vaccine-preventable diseases.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Material last updated: December 10, 2021
    • Expiration of CME credit: December 10, 2023
  • FREE

    CME: Human papillomavirus: the rationale for prevention and optimizing vaccination strategies

    Activity Description / Statement of Need:

    In this online CME self-learning activity:

    The term human papillomavirus encompasses a family of DNA viruses that are sexually transmittable and may cause either benign or malignant lesions. They are the leading cause of cervical cancer (CC), with approximately 90% of CC cases attributable to HPV, as well as a major contributor to anogenital and head and neck cancers although many patients infected with HPV will never develop any related symptoms or disease. The prevalence of any form of genital HPV in non-elderly adults in the U.S. is 42.5%, with the slightly higher prevalence in men. While there are over 40 different HPV types that may infect the genital tract, two (types 16 and 18) are associated with 66% of CC cases and two (6 and 11) cause 90% of anogenital warts.

    This learning activity has been designed to bring HCPs’ knowledge of HPV vaccination and associated disease prevention up to date and to improve their competence and performance in identifying those who would benefit from vaccination.

    Target Audience:

    The following HCPs: primary care physicians and pediatricians; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and pharmacists who practice in the aforementioned areas of specialty; and any other HCPs with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients who would benefit from HPV vaccination.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Recall the epidemiology and complications of HPV
    • Describe the strains associated with the development of complications and disease and their related pathophysiologic processes
    • Discuss current U.S. HPV vaccination recommendations and apply them to patient cases
    • List current challenges to the prevention of HPV and high-risk groups
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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1.5
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 02/16/2021
    • Expiration of CME credit: 02/16/2023
  • FREE

    Novel antimicrobials and infectious disease practice: Research updates from ID Week 2019

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a phenomenon fueled by the selection pressure leveled against microorganisms through the use and misuse of antimicrobials in clinical and agricultural settings as well as horizontal gene transfer between pathogens. The WHO predicts that there will be 50 million deaths caused by infectious diseases, and the U.N. General Assembly has designated the emergence of AMR the largest world health problem.

    The World Health Assembly has endorsed a Global Action Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance, including one step to address AMR: the sustainable investment in and development of new antimicrobials. Helping the clinician discern the role of these advances merits continuing healthcare professional education, as research suggests that HCPs are oftentimes unable to keep up with the steady publishing of literature and evolution of clinical practice. In so doing, the goal is to educate clinicians about the appropriate role of novel antibiotics so that they may more effectively address the challenge of AMR rather than contributing to it.

    Target Audience:

    HCPs specializing in: Infectious disease, critical care, and primary care; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in the aforementioned areas of specialty; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who treat patients with antimicrobials.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Identify key findings from the ID Week 2019 conference.
    • Apply the changes in CAP guidelines 2019 from 2007.
    • Identify novel drugs approved in 2019 and their potential.
    • Understand the implications of some current research and paradigm shifts.
    • Review HIV progress in the last year.
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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 06/04/2020
    • Expiration of CME credit: 06/04/2022
  • FREE

    CME: HIV Prevention: The Role of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (HIV-PrEP)

    The development of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has had a dramatic impact on HIV-related morbidity and mortality. The use of ART in HIV-infected patients has been the core strategy to not only treat HIV but also prevent vertical HIV transmission. Antiretrovirals can be used for HIV prevention in patients who are not HIV-infected but are repeatedly exposed to HIV in a strategy termed pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Although the rationale for PrEP stems from successful HIV prevention in HIV exposed infants with the use of ART during labor, early post-partum period, and throughout breastfeeding, it has more recently applied to been applied to sexual transmission (e.g., people with multiple partners or HIV serodiscordant couples) and people who inject drugs illicitly with support from the literature. Because much of what comprises evidence and guidelines supporting PrEP has been published relatively recently and because healthcare professionals are oftentimes unable to keep up with the steady publishing of literature and evolution of clinical practice in a timely manner, continuing healthcare education activities in this area are warranted.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Define the role of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) including identification of high-risk patient populations for appropriate use
    • Analyze the data that support the use of PrEP for the prevention of HIV infection and apply it to patient cases
    • Assess the safety and efficacy of PrEP in the context of the medical literature and apply that knowledge to patient cases
    • Describe recommendations for PrEP use and the limitations to PrEP, and apply them to patient cases
    • Recall the economic impact of the widespread use of PrEP including benefits and limitations

    Target Audience: The following healthcare professionals: infectious disease specialists, primary care physicians, and public health; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in infectious disease; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter HIV.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 9/23/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 9/23/21
  • FREE

    Treatment of acute COVID-19 infection: shifting strategy evolving enemy

    Activity Description / Statement of Need:

    The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has upended life as humankind knows it, leading to over 238,000,000 cases and 4,800,000 deaths worldwide at the time of writing. SARS-CoV-2 targets the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE-2) receptors present in the nasal epithelium and lungs. Viral replication leads to a variety of clinical presentations and outcomes during the acute infectious process, including: asymptomatic disease; milder symptoms such as fever, dry cough, shortness of breath, abdominal pain, anosmia, and ageusia; and, in severe cases, hypoxemia, acute respiratory stress disease, and death. Complications are not limited to the respiratory tract and may present as multi-organ involvement varying from acute cardiac injury, coagulopathies, and multisystem inflammatory syndrome. Some survivors of the disease must also grapple with reduced health-related quality of life as a result of chronic lung fibrosis and central nervous system or mental health dysfunction, including post-traumatic stress disease, attention deficit, anxiety, and overall impaired cognitive function.

    This learning activity has been designed to bring physicians knowledge of the strategies for the management of COVID-19 up to date and to improve their competence and performance in diagnosing and treating it.

    Target Audience:

    HCPs including: Hospitalists and other primary care physicians, infectious disease physicians, pulmonologists, and critical care physicians; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and pharmacists in those areas of specialty; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with acute COVID-19 infection.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 01/30/2022
    • Expiration of CME credit: 01/30/2023