Hematology CME

  • FREE

    Congenital Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (CTTP): Updates from the American Society of Hematology (ASH) 2019 annual meeting

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare blood disorder that impacts three in a million adults per year, with congenital or hereditary TTP (cTTP, also known as Upshaw-Schulman syndrome) accounting for a third of the overall incidence. The incidence of TTP rises with increasing age and the mortality rate of untreated TTP may be as high as 90%.

    In recent years molecular mechanisms contributing to TTP have been identified: patients diagnosed with TTP have larger von Willebrand factor molecules (vWF) and a defective protease enzyme of A Disintegrinlike And Metalloprotease with ThromboSpondin type 1 motif 13 (ADAMTS13), which cleaves larger vWF molecules and inhibits platelet adhesion. In congenital or hereditary TTP (cTTP, also known as Upshaw-Schulman syndrome), the gene that codes of ADAMTS13 is defective and cannot properly produce the enzyme, whereas in acquired TTP, antibody production leads to downstream enzymatic deactivation.

    Target Audience:
    The following healthcare professionals: hematologists; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in hematology; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with cTTP.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Summarize the most impactful findings presented at the ASH 2019 annual meeting relating to congenital TTP
    • Recall the pathophysiology of congenital TTP
    • Describe the clinical manifestations and methods of establishing a diagnosis of cTTP, and apply that information to a patient case
    • List treatment strategies for cTTP, and apply that information to a patient case
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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: .75
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 08/30/2020
    • Expiration of CME credit: 08/30/2022
  • FREE

    Hemophilia B: Optimizing Pharmacotherapeutic Management Strategies

    Hemophilia is a genetic disease caused by mutation of one of the genes for coagulation proteins leading to dangerous, uncontrolled bleeding. In hemophilia B, a mutation in the gene for factor IX (FIX) leads to an endogenous deficiency in the clotting factor. The incidence of hemophilia B is the same in all geographic regions, populations, and ethnic groups,affecting approximately 1 out of every 30,000 male births. The condition is diagnosed by measuring FIX activity, and patients with severe hemophilia have levels of 1% or less.

    Patients with severe hemophilia B are at risk for spontaneous, life-threatening bleeding episodes. Untreated, the life expectancy is approximately 20 years,and painful or even life-threatening morbidities include intracranial hemorrhage, severe bleeding in other organ systems, musculoskeletal injury, and joint injury. In contrast, in people with moderate or mild hemophilia, abnormal bleeding usually occurs after minor trauma or surgery.

    Physical therapy can ease symptoms if internal bleeding has damaged a patient’s joints, and surgery may be necessary if internal bleeding has caused severe damage. However, the current standard of therapy for hemophilia B is intravenous infusion of therapeutic factor concentrates. Through the reduction in the number of bleeding incidences and improvement in quality of life, factor replacement therapy has significantly reduced the morbidity and mortality of hemophilia. Furthermore, prophylactic therapy has the demonstrated benefit of reducing the development of hemophilic arthropathy.

    Target Audience:

    The following healthcare professionals: hematology, primary care physicians, and pediatricians; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in hematology as well as other Hemophilia Treatment Center HCPs; and any other clinicians with an interest in hemophilia B.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the risk factors and occurrence of hemophilia B.
    • Identify available prophylactic and treatment options for hemophilia B and apply them to a patient case.
    • Identify the new treatment options for hemophilia B.
    • Identify adherence barriers in and deliver effective treatment counseling to patients with hemophilia B.
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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 06/10/2020
    • Expiration of CME credit: 06/10/2022
  • FREE

    Hemophilia A: Optimizing Pharmacotherapeutic Management Strategies

    Hemophilia is a genetic disease caused by mutation of one of the genes for coagulation proteins leading to dangerous, uncontrolled bleeding. In hemophilia A, a mutation in the gene for factor VIII (FVIII) leads to an endogenous deficiency in the clotting factor. The incidence of hemophilia A is the same in all geographic regions, populations, and ethnic groups, affecting approximately 1 out of every 5000 male births. The condition is diagnosed by measuring FVIII activity, and patients with severe hemophilia have FVIII activity of 1% or less. Patients with severe hemophilia A are at risk for spontaneous, life-threatening bleeding episodes. Untreated, the life expectancy is approximately 20 years, and painful or even life-threatening morbidities include intracranial hemorrhage, severe bleeding in other organ systems, musculoskeletal injury, and joint injury. In contrast, in people with moderate or mild hemophilia, abnormal bleeding usually occurs after minor trauma or surgery.

    Target Audience:

    The following healthcare professionals: hematology, primary care physicians, and pediatricians; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in hematology as well as other Hemophilia Treatment Center HCPs; and any other clinicians with an interest in hemophilia A.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the risk factors and occurrence of hemophilia A.
    • Identify available prophylactic and treatment options for hemophilia A and apply them to a patient case.
    • Identify the new treatment options for hemophilia A.
    • Identify adherence barriers in and deliver effective treatment counseling to patients with hemophilia A.
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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 06/06/2020
    • Expiration of CME credit: 06/06/2022
  • FREE

    Hemophilia B: Updates from 2018 American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting (ASH 2018)

    Hemophilia is a genetic disease caused by mutation of one of the genes for coagulation proteins leading to dangerous, uncontrolled bleeding. In hemophilia B, a mutation in the gene for factor IX (FIX) leads to an endogenous deficiency in the clotting factor

    After completing Hemophilia B: Updates from 2018 American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting (ASH 2018) physicians will better be able to:

    • Describe the gene therapy and its anticipated impact on hemophilia B therapy
    • List evidence-supported benefits of switching to extended half-life / dose-interval clotting factors and apply that knowledge to patient cases
    • Summarize the most impactful findings presented at ASH 2018 meeting relating to prophylactic and therapeutic agents to treat hemophilia B, and apply** them to patient cases
    • Describe how immune modulation therapy may be used to induce immune tolerance to Factor IX inhibitors

    Target Audience: hematologists; primary care physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in hematology; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with hemophilia B.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 0.75
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: March 05, 2019
    • Expiration of CME credit: March 05, 2021
  • FREE

    Hemophilia A: Updates from 2018 American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting (ASH 2018)

    Hemophilia is a genetic disease caused by mutation of one of the genes for coagulation proteins leading to dangerous, uncontrolled bleeding.

    After completing Hemophilia A: Updates from 2018 American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting (ASH 2018) physicians will better be able to:

    • Describe the limitations of annual bleed rate as an epidemiological measure in Hemophilia A
    • Define early prophylaxis in severe hemophilia A and describe its impact on osteochondral damage
    • List evidence-supported benefits of extending clotting factor half lives
    • Summarize the most impactful findings presented at ASH 2018 meeting relating to prophylactic and therapeutic agents to treat hemophilia A, and apply them to patient cases
    • Describe the emerging therapies in the treatment of hemophilia A

     

    Target Audience:

    hematologists; primary care physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in hematology; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with Hemophilia A.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: March 04, 2019
    • Expiration of CME credit: March 04, 2021
  • FREE

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS): therapeutic updates and optimizing treatment

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a disease in which the complement system is activated in an uncontrolled manner outside the presence of coexisting disease, resulting in platelet activation, damage to endothelial cells, and a range of clinical sequelae including: which may ultimately lead to kidney failure; systemic thrombotic microangiopathy;anemia; and thrombocytopenia.

    After completing this course, you will better be able to:

    • Describe the pathophysiology of aHUS such that it might informs pairing with present treatment mechanisms
    • Describe aHUS diagnostic methods, differential diagnosis, and the benefits of earlier diagnosis
    • Describe available therapies used for treatment of aHUS and summarize the literature supporting use of those therapies
    • Design an evidence-based treatment plan for a patient with aHUS

    Target Audience: hematologists, nephrologists, and primary care physicians; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists specializing in hematology and transplant medicine; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who may clinically encounter patients with aHUS.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: July 10, 2019
    • Expiration of CME credit: July 10, 2021
  • FREE

    CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians

    Some recent topics include:
    • Cancer Screening in the United States, 2013
    • Risk Factors, Pathophysiology, and Treatment of Hot Flashes in Cancer
    • American Cancer Society Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines
    • The Role of Human Papillomavirus in Nongenital Cancers
    • Hypnosis for Cancer Care: Over 200 Years Young
    • The Current Status of Robotic Oncologic Surgery
    • Oral Complications of Cancer and Cancer Therapy: From Cancer Treatment to Survivorship
    • Electronic Patient-Reported Outcome Systems in Oncology Clinical Practice
    • Nutrition and Physical Activity Guidelines for Cancer Survivors

    Target Audience: Oncologists

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1 per course
    • CME credits awarded by: Wiley Health Learning
    • Format: On-Demand Online
  • FREE

    Cleveland Clinic Hematology/Oncology

    There is currently one webcast that offers CME credits:
    Online Webcast – Transanal Colo-Rectal Endoscopic Surgery (TACRES) Ta TME in Rectal Cancer by Cecil Approach

    Target Audience: Physicians specializing in Hematology/Oncology.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 0.75
    • CME credits awarded by: Cleveland Clinic
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: April 29, 2016
    • Expiration of CME credit: April 29, 2018
  • FREE

    Clinical Care Options Oncology

    About 40 text-based or case-based-interactive activities concerned with aspects of cancer.

    All of these categories offer CME credit: Conference Coverage, Journal Options, Management Series, Treatment Updates, Annual Updates and Interactive Cases.

    Not all activities offer CME; look for the term, “CME-certified”.

    Target Audience: Oncologists

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: Varies depending on course
    • CME credits awarded by: Various Sponsors
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: Continuously Updated