Free CME

  • FREE

    Hypoparathyroidism: Optimizing pharmacotherapeutic management strategies

    Hypoparathyroidism is a rare disorder characterized by decreased function of parathyroid glands resulting in low levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH). There are a variety of causes, including autoimmune disease, congenital defects, unintended parathyroid removal during thyroidectomy, or damage caused by radiation therapy. In a normal functioning parathyroid gland, PTH is secreted in response to low serum-ionized calcium. According to one study, nearly 60,000 people in the United States have been diagnosed with the disorder, with about 73% caused by surgery. Another study estimated the prevalence of primary hypoparathyroidism at 40 per 100,000 people in the United States.

    Target Audience:

    The following healthcare professionals: endocrinologists and primary care physicians; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in endocrinology and internal medicine; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with hypoparathyroidism.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the pathophysiology and manifestations of hypoparathyroidism and discuss how they may have relevance to treatment targets.
    • Define patient-specific goals, identify treatments directly treating hypoparathyroidism, and incorporate both in the development of a treatment plan in patient cases.
    • Describe goals and mainstays of supportive care in hypoparathyroidism and apply them to patient cases.
    • Describe barriers to care in the optimal treatment of hypoparathyroidism and suggest strategies for ameliorating them.
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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 06/22/2020
    • Expiration of CME credit: 06/22/2022
  • FREE

    Employing biosimilars in the treatment of inflammatory health conditions: How to and should I?

    Biosimilar drugs are products meant to be similar in quality, safety, and efficacy to an already licensed reference biotherapeutic product. Whereas generics are virtually identical replicas of conventional medications, biosimilars are not the same as the original product – a practically unavoidable outcome because of the considerably large molecular structure that biologics mimic. The literature suggests that learning activities focused on the evolving landscape of biosimilars, which are germane to the therapeutic area because of their potential role in cost containment. Both the FDA and medical literature independently affirm the need for clinician education on biosimilars, including:  comparative efficacy; adverse event rates and management (potential concerns have included immunogenicity); regulatory guidance on interchangeability and substitution – including prescribers retaining some degree of ability to intervene in a product’s substitution at the dispensing stage; and cost considerations.

    Target Audience:

    The following healthcare professionals: Rheumatologists, gastroenterologists, and primary care physicians; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and pharmacists who practice in the aforementioned areas of specialty; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with the inflammatory disease states covered by this activity.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe biosimilar drugs, how they differ from generic drugs, the FDA process for their approval.
    • Describe practical considerations the clinician needs when determining whether to consider when deciding whether substituting or allowing the substitution of a biosimilar medication for its reference medication, and apply them to patient case(s).
    • Describe how biosimilars for inflammatory health conditions are impacting the treatment landscape with respect to number of treatment options, affordability, and safety considerations.
    • Identify the currently available and emerging pharmacotherapeutic treatments for management of inflammatory health conditions and apply them to patient cases using evidence-based medicine.
    • Describe strategies for helping patients understand the implications of using biosimilars.
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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 06/25/2020
    • Expiration of CME credit: 06/25/2022
  • FREE

    Transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTR) and its complications: optimizing management strategies

    Transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTR) is a progressive, multisystem, life-threatening disorder characterized by the extracellular deposition of misfolded, insoluble amyloid fibrils. As TTR is a protein present in human serum, and its role is to transport thyroxine and retinol-binding proteins, it is vital for behavior, cognition, nerve regeneration, and axonal growth. TTR itself is innately amyloidogenic even without the presence of genetic mutations. The familial variant of the disease is passed to offspring through autosomal dominant inheritance, whereas the wild type variant occurs independently of genetic mutations. Left untreated, the average life expectancy of ATTR is 3 to 15 years from symptom onset.

    Target Audience:

    The following HCPs: neurologists, cardiologists, and hematologists; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists in the aforementioned areas of specialty; and any other HCPs with an interest in or who may clinically encounter patients with ATTR.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the epidemiology of ATTR, including its subtypes.
    • Compare and contrast invasive and non-invasive methods in the diagnosis of ATTR’s complications.
    • Describe challenges in the management of ATTR, including under-diagnosis and challenges patients face in understanding the diagnosis and treatment of ATTR.
    • Describe available and emerging therapies for ATTR and design an appropriate therapeutic plan including active patient involvement.
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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: .75
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 06/13/2020
    • Expiration of CME credit: 06/13/2022
  • FREE

    Hemophilia B: Optimizing Pharmacotherapeutic Management Strategies

    Hemophilia is a genetic disease caused by mutation of one of the genes for coagulation proteins leading to dangerous, uncontrolled bleeding. In hemophilia B, a mutation in the gene for factor IX (FIX) leads to an endogenous deficiency in the clotting factor. The incidence of hemophilia B is the same in all geographic regions, populations, and ethnic groups,affecting approximately 1 out of every 30,000 male births. The condition is diagnosed by measuring FIX activity, and patients with severe hemophilia have levels of 1% or less.

    Patients with severe hemophilia B are at risk for spontaneous, life-threatening bleeding episodes. Untreated, the life expectancy is approximately 20 years,and painful or even life-threatening morbidities include intracranial hemorrhage, severe bleeding in other organ systems, musculoskeletal injury, and joint injury. In contrast, in people with moderate or mild hemophilia, abnormal bleeding usually occurs after minor trauma or surgery.

    Physical therapy can ease symptoms if internal bleeding has damaged a patient’s joints, and surgery may be necessary if internal bleeding has caused severe damage. However, the current standard of therapy for hemophilia B is intravenous infusion of therapeutic factor concentrates. Through the reduction in the number of bleeding incidences and improvement in quality of life, factor replacement therapy has significantly reduced the morbidity and mortality of hemophilia. Furthermore, prophylactic therapy has the demonstrated benefit of reducing the development of hemophilic arthropathy.

    Target Audience:

    The following healthcare professionals: hematology, primary care physicians, and pediatricians; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in hematology as well as other Hemophilia Treatment Center HCPs; and any other clinicians with an interest in hemophilia B.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the risk factors and occurrence of hemophilia B.
    • Identify available prophylactic and treatment options for hemophilia B and apply them to a patient case.
    • Identify the new treatment options for hemophilia B.
    • Identify adherence barriers in and deliver effective treatment counseling to patients with hemophilia B.
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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 06/10/2020
    • Expiration of CME credit: 06/10/2022
  • FREE

    Hemophilia A: Optimizing Pharmacotherapeutic Management Strategies

    Hemophilia is a genetic disease caused by mutation of one of the genes for coagulation proteins leading to dangerous, uncontrolled bleeding. In hemophilia A, a mutation in the gene for factor VIII (FVIII) leads to an endogenous deficiency in the clotting factor. The incidence of hemophilia A is the same in all geographic regions, populations, and ethnic groups, affecting approximately 1 out of every 5000 male births. The condition is diagnosed by measuring FVIII activity, and patients with severe hemophilia have FVIII activity of 1% or less. Patients with severe hemophilia A are at risk for spontaneous, life-threatening bleeding episodes. Untreated, the life expectancy is approximately 20 years, and painful or even life-threatening morbidities include intracranial hemorrhage, severe bleeding in other organ systems, musculoskeletal injury, and joint injury. In contrast, in people with moderate or mild hemophilia, abnormal bleeding usually occurs after minor trauma or surgery.

    Target Audience:

    The following healthcare professionals: hematology, primary care physicians, and pediatricians; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in hematology as well as other Hemophilia Treatment Center HCPs; and any other clinicians with an interest in hemophilia A.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the risk factors and occurrence of hemophilia A.
    • Identify available prophylactic and treatment options for hemophilia A and apply them to a patient case.
    • Identify the new treatment options for hemophilia A.
    • Identify adherence barriers in and deliver effective treatment counseling to patients with hemophilia A.
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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 06/06/2020
    • Expiration of CME credit: 06/06/2022
  • FREE

    Novel antimicrobials and infectious disease practice: Research updates from ID Week 2019

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a phenomenon fueled by the selection pressure leveled against microorganisms through the use and misuse of antimicrobials in clinical and agricultural settings as well as horizontal gene transfer between pathogens. The WHO predicts that there will be 50 million deaths caused by infectious diseases, and the U.N. General Assembly has designated the emergence of AMR the largest world health problem.

    The World Health Assembly has endorsed a Global Action Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance, including one step to address AMR: the sustainable investment in and development of new antimicrobials. Helping the clinician discern the role of these advances merits continuing healthcare professional education, as research suggests that HCPs are oftentimes unable to keep up with the steady publishing of literature and evolution of clinical practice. In so doing, the goal is to educate clinicians about the appropriate role of novel antibiotics so that they may more effectively address the challenge of AMR rather than contributing to it.

    Target Audience:

    HCPs specializing in: Infectious disease, critical care, and primary care; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in the aforementioned areas of specialty; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who treat patients with antimicrobials.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Identify key findings from the ID Week 2019 conference.
    • Apply the changes in CAP guidelines 2019 from 2007.
    • Identify novel drugs approved in 2019 and their potential.
    • Understand the implications of some current research and paradigm shifts.
    • Review HIV progress in the last year.
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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 06/04/2020
    • Expiration of CME credit: 06/04/2022
  • FREE

    Advances in Treating Triple-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer: Optimizing Pharmacotherapeutic Management Strategies

    Over a quarter million women and almost 2,700 men in the U.S. are diagnosed with breast cancer each year, and it is the second leading cause of cancer death in women. The prognosis associated with breast has improved in the last few decades due in larger part to earlier detection. Detection at the loco-regional stage is associated with a five-year overall survival (OS) rate of ≥ 85% in contrast to 27% for distant or metastatic breast cancer (MBC).

    Because it is not curable, the goals of care in MBC are: palliation of symptoms, improvement of quality-of-life, and extension of survival. Hormone receptor positivity has traditionally conferred a better prognosis. In contrast, the presence the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is associated with a more negative prognosis. Finally, there remains a basal-like group lacking in those markers, miscellaneously labeled triple-negative (TNBC), with some cancers observed to be more aggressive, but with the overall population similar in prognosis to hormone-positive breast cancer, owing to TNBC’s heterogenous nature.

    Target Audience:

    The following healthcare professionals: Medical oncologists; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and pharmacists who practice in oncology; and any other HCPs with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with breast cancer.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the prognostic and treatment implications of TN status in the diagnosis and treatment of MBC.
    • Describe treatment options presently available for TN MBC, including safety, and apply them to patient cases using evidence-based medicine.
    • Describe emerging treatment options presently available for TN MBC, their mechanisms of action and safety, and anticipated place in therapy.
    • Discuss barriers patients with TN MBC experience in attempting to access care, including burden of disease and adverse consequences of therapy, and propose ways to ameliorate them.
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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 05/20/2020
    • Expiration of CME credit: 05/20/2021
  • FREE

    Head and Neck Cancer: Current Evidence, Recent Developments, and Future Directions

    Head and Neck Cancer: Current Evidence, Recent Developments, and Future Directions consists of two lectures with discussion, Effective Management Strategies for Head and Neck Cancer and The New Paradigm of Immunotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer, both with Robert I. Haddad, MD and Jared Weiss, MD.

    After viewing Head and Neck Cancer: Current Evidence, Recent Developments, and Future Directions, you will be better able to :
    • Assess the safety and efficacy of available and emerging multimodal regimens, including immunotherapy, for patients with head and neck cancer
    • Utilize strategies to optimally sequence available regimens for the therapeutic management of head and neck cancer
    • Evaluate the latest clinical efficacy and safety data on the use of immune checkpoint inhibitors in head and neck cancer
    • Examine anticipated adverse events related with immune checkpoint inhibitors in head and neck cancer

    Target Audience:
    This program is intended for medical and radiation oncologists, head and neck surgeons, otolaryngologists, ear, nose and throat (ENT) specialists, and other health care professionals (primary care providers, physicians-in-training, oncology nurses, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, physician assistants, etc.) involved and/or interested in the therapeutic management of patients with head and neck cancer.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 2
    • CME credits awarded by: Postgraduate Institute for Medicine
    • Format: On-Demand Online, Online Video
    • Material last updated: August 24, 2017
    • Expiration of CME credit: February 24, 2018
  • FREE

    Emerging Therapies for Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    Emerging Therapies for Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma consists of a single lecture, Emerging Therapies for Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma, with discussion by Ravi Vij, MD, MBA and David Dingli, MD, PhD.

    After viewing Emerging Therapies for Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma, you will be better able to :
    • Identify disease-related, patient-related, and cytogenetic factors that shape treatment decisions for the management of relapsed/refractory MM
    • Examine safety and efficacy data of emerging strategies for patients with MM who have received prior lines of therapies including proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory agents
    • Adopt evidence-based best practices in managing carcinoid syndrome, including strategies to address refractory or poorly controlled symptoms
    • Discuss the therapeutic implications of combination regimens involving emerging agents with currently available treatment option

    Target Audience:
    This program is intended for US-based hematologist-oncologists, oncologists, oncology nurses, internal medicine physicians, family medicine/primary care physicians, and other clinicians who care for patients with multiple myeloma.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: University of Nebraska Medical Center, Center for Continuing Education
    • Format: On-Demand Online, Online Video
    • Material last updated: September 13, 2017
    • Expiration of CME credit: March 13, 2018
  • FREE

    SIO University Interventional Oncology

    Earn CME with these new modules on lung cancer which include education on advances in lung cancer treatment, surgical and radiofrequency-ablative techniques, targeted therapies, and immunotherapies. Each takes less than 30 minutes to complete!

    Visit IO University to access this free education now!

    Target Audiences:
    Clinicians practicing interventional oncology (IO) or those who are interested in learning more about IO.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 3.25
    • CME credits awarded by: The France Foundation in collaboration with the Society of Interventional Oncology
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: October 2017
    • Expiration of CME credit: October 2018