ScientiaCME Free CME Courses

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    CME: Updates in vaccine-preventable diseases: meningococcal meningitis

    Meningococcal disease is a potentially severe bacterial infection caused by Neisseria meningitidis that may lead to serious sequelae and death in some even with appropriate treatment. N. meningitidis is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis and sepsis in the United States. Since the peak of the disease in the late 1990s, the incidence has declined annually and was at historic low rate of 0.11 per 100,000 population (349 cases) in the year 2017. Among the identified bacterial serogroups, B, C, and Y cause the majority of cases in the United States. Sixty percent of cases among patients 0-59 months and 50% of cases among 17-23 years of age are caused by serogroup B. Seventy-three percent of all cases among eleven year old or more are caused by serogroups C, W, or Y.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Recall epidemiology, clinical features, and complications of meningococcal meningitis
    • Recognize high-risk groups (e.g., 16-23 years of age) and describe the importance of immunizing them
    • Describe present meningococcal vaccination recommendations, and apply them to patient cases
    • Describe the importance of vaccine series completion to patients in the prevention of invasive meningococcal disease caused by various serotypes
    • Formulate an approaches to engaging with adolescents and young adults regarding meningococcal vaccination

    Target Audience:

    The following HCPs: primary care physicians, pediatricians, and public health professionals; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in family medicine; and any other clinicians with an interest in or who commonly encounter patients eligible for vaccination against meningococcal disease.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 9/24/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 9/24/21
  • FREE

    CME: HIV Prevention: The Role of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (HIV-PrEP)

    The development of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has had a dramatic impact on HIV-related morbidity and mortality. The use of ART in HIV-infected patients has been the core strategy to not only treat HIV but also prevent vertical HIV transmission. Antiretrovirals can be used for HIV prevention in patients who are not HIV-infected but are repeatedly exposed to HIV in a strategy termed pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Although the rationale for PrEP stems from successful HIV prevention in HIV exposed infants with the use of ART during labor, early post-partum period, and throughout breastfeeding, it has more recently applied to been applied to sexual transmission (e.g., people with multiple partners or HIV serodiscordant couples) and people who inject drugs illicitly with support from the literature. Because much of what comprises evidence and guidelines supporting PrEP has been published relatively recently and because healthcare professionals are oftentimes unable to keep up with the steady publishing of literature and evolution of clinical practice in a timely manner, continuing healthcare education activities in this area are warranted.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Define the role of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) including identification of high-risk patient populations for appropriate use
    • Analyze the data that support the use of PrEP for the prevention of HIV infection and apply it to patient cases
    • Assess the safety and efficacy of PrEP in the context of the medical literature and apply that knowledge to patient cases
    • Describe recommendations for PrEP use and the limitations to PrEP, and apply them to patient cases
    • Recall the economic impact of the widespread use of PrEP including benefits and limitations

    Target Audience: The following healthcare professionals: infectious disease specialists, primary care physicians, and public health; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in infectious disease; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter HIV.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 9/23/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 9/23/21
  • FREE

    CME: Ulcerative Colitis: Updates from the DDW 2019 Annual Meeting

    IBD is a broad term that includes many different forms of inflammatory bowel conditions, the most common of which are ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease, the former of which exclusively affects the colon and rectum. Guidelines exist for the treatment of UC, but they are constantly changing to include updated information. Despite the plethora of guidelines available, there are issues surrounding guideline adherence by physicians, patient satisfaction, the quality of treatment and a patient’s QOL. Given the data from multiple studies that physicians are either not aware of updated practice guidelines or are not utilizing them, that this lack of knowledge is affecting patient satisfaction, and that there may be demographically-based barriers to care, educational activities are warranted to keep HCPs abreast of best practices in patients with UC. This activity has been designed to review treatment strategies, emerging therapies, and gaps in care of patients with UC.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe long-term outcomes of UC patients with dysplasia who undergo endoscopic resection and surveillance and apply that information to a patient case
    • Describe the effect of endoscopic and histologic remission as treatment targets
    • Describe the risk of biologic therapy use in special populations, such as elderly and surgical patients and apply that information to a patient case
    • Recall emerging data on biologic drug safety and efficacy

    Target Audience:

    Healthcare professionals specializing in: gastroenterology, internal medicine, and those who otherwise commonly care for patients with UC.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 9/23/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 9/23/21
  • FREE

    CME: The problem with vaccines: public hesitancy and refusal

    Universal vaccination is one of the most important public health initiatives of the last century. The rates of vaccine-preventable illnesses have dropped precipitously with each introduction of an effective vaccine. Vaccinations not only protect the public against specific infectious diseases but also reduce future consequences, sequelae, and complications of disease, such as in the cases of: human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine and cancer; rotavirus vaccine and type 1 diabetes; and the measles vaccine and all-cause mortality. Among people born between 1994 and 2013, vaccination is responsible for the prevention of 322 million illnesses, 21 million hospitalizations, and 732,000 deaths, resulting in a savings of nearly $1.7 trillion in total costs. Extrapolating these predictions across all generations, the benefits of universal vaccination are considerable. Despite the many benefits of vaccination and the relatively low risks, vaccine hesitancy is a growing concern among health care professionals and has led to the resurgence of vaccine-preventable illnesses in pockets of the United States.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe common barriers to adherence to recommended vaccination schedules
    • Discuss ways in which to provide strong recommendations for vaccinations while dispelling myths among patients and caregivers
    • Describe vaccination benefits and risks with patients using techniques that have been shown to improve patient satisfaction and vaccine uptake
    • Explain methods to improve vaccination adherence, and implement strategies to improve accessibility, simplify vaccination schedules, and maximize the opportunities for vaccination

    Target Audience:

    The following HCPs: primary care physicians, pediatricians, and public health professionals; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in adult internal medicine and pediatrics; and any other clinicians who commonly encounter patients eligible for protection against vaccine-preventable diseases.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 9/16/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 9/16/21
  • FREE

    CME: Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC): Optimizing Pharmacotherapeutic and Interventional Management Strategies

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a cancer that is borne and takes root in the nephrons and is responsible for the vast majority – 85% – of all renal cancers. With risk factors that include smoking, obesity, cadmium exposure, older age, and genetics, the five year survival rate of those afflicted with kidney cancer overall is 68%. In part because there are not any clear early symptoms associated with kidney cancer, RCC is discovered predominantly after it has already progressed to advanced stages, with the brain, bones, lungs, and liver serving as some of the most common sites of metastases. RCC’s treatment depends on its stage and size, with surgeryutilized for localized tumors and systemic therapy a mainstay of care for metastatic disease.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the role of the immune system in cancer and cancer therapy in RCC
    • Describe immuno- and monoclonal therapies mechanisms of action and the biochemical pathways they impact in RCC
    • Identify the treatment modalities currently available for management of RCC and apply them to patient cases using evidence-based medicine
    • Describe the differences in safety profiles between conventional cytotoxic, monoclonal, and immunotherapy in RCC
    • Describe methods for combatting barriers to patient care, including fostering a strong provider-patient relationship

    Target Audience:

    The following healthcare professionals: medical oncologists; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in oncology; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with RCC.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 9/11/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 9/11/21
  • FREE

    CME: Treatment strategies in Fabry disease

    Fabry disease is characterized by a deficiency of the glycoside hydrolase enzyme alpha galactosidase A, resulting in the accumulation of the glycolipid globotriaosylceramide throughout the body, particularly prominently in the blood vessels. A defect in the enzyme alpha galactosidase A results in glycosphingolipid accumulation, ultimately leading to multi-organ dysfunction and the patient’s premature death. Early symptoms, which occur during childhood, involve pain and may include Raynaud phenomenon, paresthesias, and arthralgia in the extremities and proximal limbs, as well as impaired gastrointestinal emptying, resulting in abdominal pain, diarrhea, early satiety, postprandial bloating, nausea, and vomiting. In adulthood, the disease’s impact spreads beyond and begins to affect the cardiac and renal systems.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the importance of quick and accurate Fabry disease diagnosis and treatment.
    • Using established methods, determine likelihood of Fabry disease given a patient case.
    • Appropriately describe available therapies used for treatment of Fabry disease and explain current literature supporting use of those therapies.
    • Design and implement an appropriate therapeutic plan for treatment of Fabry disease.
    • Describe future therapies currently being investigated for the treatment of Fabry disease.

    Target Audience: The following healthcare professionals: cardiologists, nephrologists, pediatricians, and primary care physicians; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who may clinically encounter patients with Fabry disease.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 9/4/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 9/4/21
  • FREE

    CME: Prevention and management of influenza infection

    Influenza has been recognized as a global public health menace since at least 100 years ago with the 1918-19 pandemic, which infected an estimated one-third of the world’s population and was responsible for the deaths of one in ten, or 50 million, of those infected. While some have contended that a significant number of deaths associated with the 1918 pandemic may have actually been attributable to acid-base derangements and pulmonary edema associated with contemporary aspirin dosing in the toxic range of two to eight times what is presently the maximum recommended dose – it remains a significant public health concern, with the 2017-2018 flu season in recent decades with an estimated 80,000 deaths (typical range 12,000-56,000 per year),coming with an annual cost of $16 billion.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Determine the impact of influenza infection
    • Describe influenza vaccination recommendations and apply them to patient cases
    • Describe treatment recommendations and apply them to patient cases
    • Describe present challenges to the prevention and treatment of influenza and develop strategies to combat them

    Target Audience:

    Healthcare professionals specializing in: infectious disease, internal medicine, and pediatrics; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who specialize in the aforementioned areas; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with influenza.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 7/23/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 7/23/21
  • FREE

    CME: Parkinson’s disease: optimizing pharmacotherapeutic management strategies and addressing clinical challenges

    Parkinson’s disease (PD), a central nervous system disease of the autonomic and basal ganglia, neocortex, and spinal cord, is thought to affect about one million people in the United States. Its etiology is thought to include a confluence of factors including age, genetic predisposition, comorbid disease states (e.g., Gaucher’s disease), and environmental factor dynamics. Present in 1% of people over age 65 and 2.5% of those older than 80, its symptoms are the direct result of dopaminergic neuronal degradation along the nigrostriatal tract and include bradykinesia, resting tremor, muscle rigidity, and gait disturbance.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the pathophysiology and disease progression of PD and their impact on patient quality-of-life
    • Describe the common clinical presentation(s) of PD
    • Apply recent biomedical literature to the management of PD the primary disease, levodopa-related fluctuations in motor function and dyskinesia, and other disease complications and effects impacting quality-of-life
    • Identify the advances in the biomedical literature concerning PD and emerging treatment options
    • List challenges and barriers to care associated with treating patients with PD

    Target Audience:

    The following healthcare professionals: neurologists and primary care physicians; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in neurology; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with PD.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 7/6/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 7/6/21
  • FREE

    CME: Migraine Headaches: Therapeutic Updates and Contemporary Management Strategies

    Migraine headache is the leading condition of recurrent cephalalgias of moderate or severe intensity. The condition has been identified as one of the most common neurological disorders occurring in adult women (17%) approximately three times more than in men: in the U.S. 17.1% of women and 5.6% of men experience at least one migraine per year. It is one of the top five reasons for emergency department visits by patients ages 18 to 44.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe clinical features of migraines, the rationale for understanding migraine as a syndrome, and migraine neurochemistry (including calcitonin gene-related peptide, serotonin, etc.) such that that they inform pairing with treatment mechanisms
    • Describe the characteristics of diagnosis of episodic and chronic migraines and the qualities
    • embodied by patients suitable for prophylactic pharmacotherapy, and apply that knowledge to patient cases

    • List present and emerging pharmacotherapeutic treatment options for both prophylactic and rescue therapies for migraine headaches and apply them to patient cases using evidence-based medicine
    • Describe challenges to the successful management of migraine, including through a collaborative care, team-based approach between disciplines

    Target Audience:

    Healthcare professionals who are: primary care physicians, neurologists, headache specialists, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurses, and pharmacists who specialize in neurology and primary care; and those who otherwise commonly care for or clinically encounter patients who may experience migraine headache.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 5/31/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 5/31/20
  • FREE

    CME: Pediatric Crohn’s disease: therapeutic updates and optimizing treatment

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that is defined by a transmural process that often occurs in the terminal ileum but may occur in any portion of the GI tract. Although the exact etiology of CD is unknown, a handful of genetic, immunological, and environmental risk factors have been identified. Research suggests that in genetically susceptible patients, there is an impaired immune response to commensal or pathogenic intestinal microbiota that drives mucosal inflammation. The incidence of pediatric CD (pCD) is increasing around the globe, varying between 2.5 to 11.4 per 100,000, with an estimated prevalence of 58 per 100,000. Approximately 25% of patients are diagnosed with IBD before the age of 18. Intestinal and abdominal complications such as strictures, abscesses, and fistulas are common among pediatric patients and increase as the disease progresses. IBD impairs attendance at school, and psychosocial ramifications in children diagnosed with IBD incdude a higher incidence of depression and anxiety.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe differences between European and American approaches to pCD
    • Identify the present nutritional and pharmacotherapeutic treatment options currently available for management of pCD and apply them to patient cases using evidence-based medicine
    • Identify new and emerging approaches to and therapies for the treatment of pCD
    • Evaluate a treatment plan for a specific patient based on severity of pCD to optimize safety and efficacy, suggesting modifications for improvement

    Target Audience:

    The following healthcare professionals: pediatricians and pediatric gastroenterologists; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with pCD.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 5/24/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 5/24/21