Free Pediatrics CME

  • FREE

    CME: Treatment strategies in Fabry disease

    Fabry disease is characterized by a deficiency of the glycoside hydrolase enzyme alpha galactosidase A, resulting in the accumulation of the glycolipid globotriaosylceramide throughout the body, particularly prominently in the blood vessels. A defect in the enzyme alpha galactosidase A results in glycosphingolipid accumulation, ultimately leading to multi-organ dysfunction and the patient’s premature death. Early symptoms, which occur during childhood, involve pain and may include Raynaud phenomenon, paresthesias, and arthralgia in the extremities and proximal limbs, as well as impaired gastrointestinal emptying, resulting in abdominal pain, diarrhea, early satiety, postprandial bloating, nausea, and vomiting. In adulthood, the disease’s impact spreads beyond and begins to affect the cardiac and renal systems.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the importance of quick and accurate Fabry disease diagnosis and treatment.
    • Using established methods, determine likelihood of Fabry disease given a patient case.
    • Appropriately describe available therapies used for treatment of Fabry disease and explain current literature supporting use of those therapies.
    • Design and implement an appropriate therapeutic plan for treatment of Fabry disease.
    • Describe future therapies currently being investigated for the treatment of Fabry disease.

    Target Audience: The following healthcare professionals: cardiologists, nephrologists, pediatricians, and primary care physicians; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who may clinically encounter patients with Fabry disease.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 9/4/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 9/4/21
  • FREE

    CME: Prevention and management of influenza infection

    Influenza has been recognized as a global public health menace since at least 100 years ago with the 1918-19 pandemic, which infected an estimated one-third of the world’s population and was responsible for the deaths of one in ten, or 50 million, of those infected. While some have contended that a significant number of deaths associated with the 1918 pandemic may have actually been attributable to acid-base derangements and pulmonary edema associated with contemporary aspirin dosing in the toxic range of two to eight times what is presently the maximum recommended dose – it remains a significant public health concern, with the 2017-2018 flu season in recent decades with an estimated 80,000 deaths (typical range 12,000-56,000 per year),coming with an annual cost of $16 billion.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Determine the impact of influenza infection
    • Describe influenza vaccination recommendations and apply them to patient cases
    • Describe treatment recommendations and apply them to patient cases
    • Describe present challenges to the prevention and treatment of influenza and develop strategies to combat them

    Target Audience:

    Healthcare professionals specializing in: infectious disease, internal medicine, and pediatrics; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who specialize in the aforementioned areas; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with influenza.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 7/23/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 7/23/21
  • FREE

    CME: Pediatric Crohn’s disease: therapeutic updates and optimizing treatment

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that is defined by a transmural process that often occurs in the terminal ileum but may occur in any portion of the GI tract. Although the exact etiology of CD is unknown, a handful of genetic, immunological, and environmental risk factors have been identified. Research suggests that in genetically susceptible patients, there is an impaired immune response to commensal or pathogenic intestinal microbiota that drives mucosal inflammation. The incidence of pediatric CD (pCD) is increasing around the globe, varying between 2.5 to 11.4 per 100,000, with an estimated prevalence of 58 per 100,000. Approximately 25% of patients are diagnosed with IBD before the age of 18. Intestinal and abdominal complications such as strictures, abscesses, and fistulas are common among pediatric patients and increase as the disease progresses. IBD impairs attendance at school, and psychosocial ramifications in children diagnosed with IBD incdude a higher incidence of depression and anxiety.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe differences between European and American approaches to pCD
    • Identify the present nutritional and pharmacotherapeutic treatment options currently available for management of pCD and apply them to patient cases using evidence-based medicine
    • Identify new and emerging approaches to and therapies for the treatment of pCD
    • Evaluate a treatment plan for a specific patient based on severity of pCD to optimize safety and efficacy, suggesting modifications for improvement

    Target Audience:

    The following healthcare professionals: pediatricians and pediatric gastroenterologists; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with pCD.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 5/24/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 5/24/21
  • FREE

    CME: Gaucher disease: Updates from recent research findings

    Gaucher disease (GD) is characterized by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase, resulting in the accumulation of sphingolipids throughout the body but most manifesting prominently in the bones. GD is subcategorized based on clinical features: type 1 GD is the non-neuronopathic form and affects mainly the inner organs, while types 2 and 3 are the acute and sub-acute neuropathic forms, whose pathology manifests predominantly within central nervous system. GD impacts about 1 in 75,000 births, making it one of the most common lysosomal storage diseases. One of the first of GD’s complications is the chronic anemia and a persistent bleeding risk. Another is the hepatosplenomegaly, which may be a part of the initial clinical presentation, as may the anatomical abnormalities of bone deformities and stunted growth.

    By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

    • Describe the pathogenesis, clinical presentations, complications, and epidemiology of Gaucher disease including updated recently presented material
    • Describe principles and problems regarding screening for and diagnosing Gaucher disease that can applied to patient cases
    • Describe emerging therapies for Gaucher disease based on research recently presented
    • Design and implement appropriate therapeutic plans for treatment of Gaucher disease based on research recently presented

    Target Audience:

    The following healthcare professionals: pediatricians, neurologists, endocrinologists, and primary care physicians; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who may clinically encounter patients with Gaucher disease.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 4/28/19
    • Expiration of CME credit: 4/28/21