Neurology CME

  • 20% OFF W/ CODE: CME20

    Oakstone CME Electrodiagnostic Medicine and Neuromuscular Disorders

    Convenient, Comprehensive Neurology and PM&R CME

    Designed for neurologists and physical medicine & rehabilitation doctors, residents, and fellows, this continuing medical education program covers all diagnostic and management approaches to both inherited and acquired neuromuscular conditions.

    The 41 lectures in Electrodiagnostic Medicine and Neuromuscular Disorders — each just 30 and 45 minutes in length — delve into basic techniques and clinical applications of electrodiagnosis and ultrasound, as well as generalized disorders, motor neuron diseases, polyneuropathies, neuromuscular junction disorders, and myopathies. Key take-home points from this online CME program include:

    • Basics of Needle EMG: Voluntary Activity. Motor unit potential waveform reflects the change in motor unit architecture due to disease processes, while the interference pattern provides information about the number of motor units and their activation.
    • Neuropathies Associated with Systemic Disease and Cancer. Countless systemic disorders — metabolic, nutritional, inflammatory, infectious, neoplastic, and others — can cause neuropathy and accordingly, neuropathy can take many forms. Carefully characterizing the phenotype of neuropathy can help narrow down the relevant causes.
    • Muscle Channelopathies. For a patient with a personal and family history of muscle stiffness and pain, consider genetic testing for myotonic disorders.
    • And more…
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    • Cost: $1145
    • Credit hours: 28.50
    • CME credits awarded by: Oakstone Publishing, LLC.
    • Format: Online, On Demand
    • Material last updated: February 15, 2023
    • Expiration of CME credit: February 15, 2026
  • FREE

    Updates in the medical management of Pompe disease

    Activity Description / Statement of Need:

    In this online, self-learning activity:

    Pompe disease (PD) is a progressive, often fatal, autosomal recessive, neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations of the α-glucosidase gene on chromosome 17. PD is characterized by glycogen accumulation in skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscles due to a deficiency in α-glucosidase (GAA), an important lysosomal enzyme responsible for glycogen catabolism. PD is categorized into three groups based on symptoms and age of onset. The classic infantile form presents in the first year of life, usually in the first two months, with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The non-classic infantile form presents later in the first year of life, without or with less severe cardiomyopathy. The late onset form of PD presents any time after one year of life, usually without cardiac complications.

    PD is rare, with one study estimating the incidence in the U.S. to be 1 in 22,000 births. The biggest risk factor for the disease is genetics; at conception, each sibling of an affected individual has a 25% chance of being affected, a 50% chance of being an asymptomatic carrier, and a 25% chance of being not a carrier. Nonspecific diagnostic findings for PD may include abnormal EMG, elevated serum creatine kinase, elevated transaminases and elevated lactate dehydrogenase. A definitive diagnosis for PD involves a dried blood spot test to determine GAA enzyme activity level; reduced GAA activity (less than 40% of normal) is indicative of a positive diagnosis. A gene mutation analysis, or another GAA enzyme test using a different area of tissue, is recommended to confirm the diagnosis. The disease is not uncommonly undiagnosed or is misdiagnosed, representing one practice gap that continued HCP education may address, particularly given that earlier treatment may minimize rapid and irreversible disease progression.

    Target Audience:

    The following HCPs: Neurologists, pediatricians, and primary care physicians; physician assistants and nurse practitioners in those areas of specialty; pharmacists who practice in specialty pharmacies that treat patients with rare diseases; and any other HCPs with an interest in or who may clinically encounter patients with PD.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: .75
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: April 29, 2022
    • Expiration of CME credit: April 29, 2024
  • FREE

    Waking to our potential in the management of narcolepsy and excessive daytime sleepiness: Treatment updates and gaps in care

    Activity Description / Statement of Need:

    In this online, self-learning activity:

    Narcolepsy is a neurologic disorder characterized by inappropriate regulation of the sleep-wake cycle and excessive sleepiness during waking hoursAffected individuals may fall asleep at inappropriate times, such as when talking to others, eating, or even driving. Roughly 135,000 to 200,000 people in the United States are estimated to have narcolepsy. Women and men are affected by narcolepsy equally, and most patients begin having symptoms between the ages of 7 and 25 years. The treatment of narcolepsy may be complicated and must be tailored individually after careful evaluation of the patient’s symptoms.

    Target Audience:

    The following HCPs: neurologists, internists, PCPs, psychiatrists; nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and pharmacists who specialize in the aforementioned areas of specialty; and those who otherwise commonly care for or clinically encounter patients with sleep disorders.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: 03/22/2023
    • Expiration of CME credit: 03/22/2025