Free CME

  • FREE

    Differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC): therapeutic updates and optimizing treatment

    The incidence of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is on the rise over the past 10 years and roughly 57,000 new cases were reported in 2017 alone.

    After completing Differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC): therapeutic updates and optimizing treatment physicians will better be able to: 

    • Recognize factors affecting the diagnosis, staging, and prognosis of patients with DTC.
    • Identify present and emerging pharmacotherapeutic treatments for the management of unresectable DTC and apply them to patient cases using evidence-based medicine
    • Describe how to manage challenges that arise during treatment with approved and investigational medicines for DTC, including adverse effect management, and apply** that knowledge to a patient case
    • Describe the challenges associated with DTC treatment, focusing specifically on the risks (e.g., adverse drug reactions, drug interactions, etc.) of the agents used to treat the disease, and apply that information in a patient case

     

    Target Audience: medical oncologists, endocrinologists; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in oncology; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with DTC.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 0.75
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: March 15, 2019
    • Expiration of CME credit: March 15, 2021
  • FREE

    Melanoma: Best Practices, Barriers to Care, and Emerging Therapies

    By the end of Melanoma: Best Practices, Barriers to Care, and Emerging Therapies, you will be able to:
    • Describe challenges to effective diagnosis and prevention of malignant melanoma.
    • Identify present and emerging treatment strategies for melanoma, weighing their risk-benefit profiles in the setting of patient cases.
    • Recognize the appropriate therapeutic choices in individual patients with based on their demographic and clinical characteristics, applying them to patient cases.
    • Discuss emerging therapies and their potential place(s) in therapy in melanoma.
    • Describe barriers to care in the treatment of melanoma and develop strategies to ameliorate them.

    Target Audience:
    Healthcare professionals specializing in: oncology, dermatology, family medicine, internal medicine, or those who otherwise commonly care for patients with malignant melanoma.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Expiration of CME credit: Two years after release
  • FREE

    Short Bowel Syndrome – updates from DDW 2018

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a condition in which a patient exhibits malabsorption-induced diarrhea, dehydration, electrolyte imbalances, and malnutrition due to decreased nutrient absorption that results from extensive surgical resection of the intestine or congenital defects. It is a form of intestinal failure (IF), which is defined as a need for supplementary parenteral or enteral nutrition when intestinal function is insufficient to meet the body’s nutritional requirements.

    After reviewing Short Bowel Syndrome – updates from DDW 2018 physicians will better be able to:

    • Describe current trends in the epidemiology of SBS
    • List causes of SBS in pediatrics and adults
    • Review the clinical manifestations and complications of SBS
    • Summarize updates in medical management in SBS and apply them to patient cases
    • Discuss surgical strategies in the management of SBS and apply them to patient cases

    Target Audience: gastroenterologists and primary care physicians; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in gastroenterology; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with Short Bowel Syndrom.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: October 07, 2018
    • Expiration of CME credit: October 07, 2020
  • FREE

    Interstitial Lung Disease with Progressive Lung Disease Phenotype (ILD-PF): Therapeutic Updates, Best Practices, and Emerging Therapies

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a collective term used to categorize more than 200 different types of diseases that affect the alveolar structures, the pulmonary interstitium, and small airways.

    After completing Interstitial Lung Disease with Progressive Lung Disease Phenotype (ILD-PF): Therapeutic Updates, Best Practices, and Emerging Therapies you will be able to:

    • Describe the pathophysiology of and risk factors for ILD-PF such that it might inform treatment mechanisms and strategies
    • Identify signs and symptoms of ILD-PF (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis, chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis, unclassified ILD)
    • Describe the prevalence, morbidity, and mortality, burden of illness associated with ILD-PF and, conversely, the benefits associated with early identification and treatment
    • Describe current treatment standards and monitoring parameters (HRCT, PFTs) of ILD-PF, including developments in clinical research and treatment guidelines, and apply them to patient cases
    • Discuss ways to improve clinician communication with their patients, including disease education

     

    Target Audience: pulmonologists, rheumatologists, primary care physicians, pathologists, dermatologists; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists specializing in pulmonology; and any other HCPs who have an interest in or otherwise clinically encounter patients with ILD-Pf.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: January 27, 2019
    • Expiration of CME credit: January 27, 2021
  • FREE

    Hemophilia A: Updates from 2018 American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting (ASH 2018)

    Hemophilia is a genetic disease caused by mutation of one of the genes for coagulation proteins leading to dangerous, uncontrolled bleeding.

    After completing Hemophilia A: Updates from 2018 American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting (ASH 2018) physicians will better be able to:

    • Describe the limitations of annual bleed rate as an epidemiological measure in Hemophilia A
    • Define early prophylaxis in severe hemophilia A and describe its impact on osteochondral damage
    • List evidence-supported benefits of extending clotting factor half lives
    • Summarize the most impactful findings presented at ASH 2018 meeting relating to prophylactic and therapeutic agents to treat hemophilia A, and apply them to patient cases
    • Describe the emerging therapies in the treatment of hemophilia A

     

    Target Audience:

    hematologists; primary care physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in hematology; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with Hemophilia A.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: March 04, 2019
    • Expiration of CME credit: March 04, 2021
  • FREE

    Hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTR) treatment strategies: best practices and emerging therapies

    Transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTR) is a progressive, multisystem, life-threatening disorder characterized by the extracellular deposition of misfolded, insoluble amyloid fibrils.

    After completing Hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTR) treatment strategies: best practices and emerging therapies physicians will better be able to:

    • Describe the pathophysiology of ATTR such that it might inform treatment mechanisms
    • Describe available therapies used for treatment of ATTR and explain current literature supporting use of those therapies
    • Design and implement an appropriate therapeutic plan for treatment of ATTR
    • Describe future therapies currently being investigated for the treatment of ATTR

    Target Audience: neurologists, cardiologists, and hematologists; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists in the aforementioned areas of specialty; and any other HCPs with an interest in or who may clinically encounter patients with ATTR.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 0.75
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: March 28, 2019
    • Expiration of CME credit: March 28, 2021
  • FREE

    Multiple Myeloma (MM): Updates from 23rd Annual Congress of EHA (EHA 2018)

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematologic malignancy of the lymphocytes. All cases are marked by monoclonal gammopathy, and while the true cause is unknown, associated factors are thought to include: radiation, genetics, viral infections, and the human immunodeficiency virus.

    After completing Multiple Myeloma (MM): Updates from 23rd Annual Congress of EHA (EHA 2018) physicians will better be able to:

    • Summarize the most impactful findings presented at EHA 2018 meeting relating to initial treatment of transplant eligible and ineligible myeloma
    • Summarize the most impactful findings presented at EHA 2018 meeting relating to role of autologous stem cell transplant
    • Summarize the most impactful findings presented at EHA 2018 meeting relating to current role of monoclonal antibodies
    • Summarize the most impactful findings presented at EHA 2018 meeting relating to novel immune therapies

    Target Audience: hematologists and oncologists; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who practice in oncology; and any other healthcare professionals with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients with MM.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 0.75
    • CME credits awarded by: ScientiaCME
    • Format: On-Demand Online
    • Material last updated: April 15, 2019
    • Expiration of CME credit: April 15, 2021
  • FREE

    Fact or Fiction? Test Your Knowledge on Assessment and Management Strategies in Tardive Dyskinesia

    At any given time, roughly one-quarter of individuals taking antipsychotics experience TD, a condition characterized by involuntary movements of the face and body. Moreover, as the use of antipsychotics has expanded to disorders such as depression, behavioral disorders, and dementia, TD is no longer primarily limited to patients with schizophrenia. TD has an outsized impact on patients’ ability to carry out daily tasks and interact with others. However, because TD has long been considered an irreversible consequence of the use of antipsychotics or other dopamine receptor–blocking agents, many clinicians have come to view it with a sort of “therapeutic nihilism.” As a result, many patients have not received treatment for their TD. Recently, the US FDA approved 2 medications, both vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) inhibitors, to treat TD, giving patients access to the first well-tolerated oral treatments shown to be effective for this condition. To ensure that patients receive maximum benefit from this advance in TD treatment, clinicians must learn how to integrate VMAT2 inhibitors into their practice. In this activity, an expert faculty member will dispel common myths about TD, educating clinicians about how to recognize and diagnose TD promptly, how VMAT2 inhibitors work to improve TD symptoms, how the 2 approved agents differ, and how VMAT2 inhibitors can be used alongside other strategies to improve outcomes for patients with TD.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1.5
    • CME credits awarded by: Medical Education Resources
    • Format: On-Demand Online
  • FREE

    The Evolution of Insulin Replacement Therapy: New Perspectives and Clinical Applications

    The Evolution of Insulin Replacement Therapy consists of 4 presentations with discussion:
    • Session 1: Insulin Options for Diabetes: Update on their Evolution
    • Session 2: Advancing to Insulin Therapy for Type 2 Diabetes: The Impact of the New Insulin Options
    • Session 3: Physiologic Insulin Replacement: Practical Approaches for the Primary Care Provider
    • Session 4: The Evolution of Glycemic Monitoring and Insulin Delivery Devices: Why the Primary Care Provider Should Understand the Options

    At the conclusion of The Evolution of Insulin Replacement Therapy, you will be able to:
    • Identify clinically relevant pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of the new insulins and insulin combinations
    • Discuss the clinical importance of similarities and differences between a biosimilar insulin and a reference insulin
    • Recognize the indications for advancement to insulin replacement therapy for people with T2DM
    • Identify clinically relevant pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of the new insulins and insulin combinations
    • Describe initiation and titration methods for new insulin-based therapies to optimize achievement of glycemic goals while minimizing adverse effects
    • Discuss strategies to overcome patient and clinician barriers to the successful initiation and utilization of insulin therapy in the context of the new insulin-based therapies, and monitoring and delivery devices

    Target Audience:
    This program is intended for US-based primary care providers, clinical endocrinologists/diabetologists, nephrologists, cardiologists, emergency department specialists, pharmacists, and other clinicians caring for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 4
    • CME credits awarded by: Joslin Diabetes Center
    • Format: On-Demand Online, Online Video
    • Material last updated: September 14, 2017
    • Expiration of CME credit: May 30, 2018
  • FREE

    Treatment Updates on Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy

    Treatment Updates on Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy emphasizes the use of IVIg in the treatment of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy.

    The presentation consists of a single lecture, Treatment Updates on Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy, with discussion by Roy L. Freeman, MD, Richard J. Barohn, MD and Kenneth C. Gorson, MD.

    After viewing Treatment Updates on Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy, you will be better able to :
    • Conduct a thorough and timely evaluation and differential diagnosis of patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.
    • Devise appropriate treatment regimen for the effective management of chronic inflammatory polyneuropathy based on guidelines and clinical evidence.

    Target Audiences:
    This program is intended for US-based neurologists, immunologists, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and nurses who manage, or have an interest in managing patients with immune-mediated neuropathies.

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    • Cost: Free
    • Credit hours: 1
    • CME credits awarded by: Postgraduate Institute for Medicine
    • Format: On-Demand Online, Online Video
    • Material last updated: July 27, 2017
    • Expiration of CME credit: July 27, 2018