CME: Human papillomavirus: the rationale for prevention and optimizing vaccination strategies

Cost: Free

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Activity Description / Statement of Need:

In this online CME self-learning activity:

The term human papillomavirus encompasses a family of DNA viruses that are sexually transmittable and may cause either benign or malignant lesions. They are the leading cause of cervical cancer (CC), with approximately 90% of CC cases attributable to HPV, as well as a major contributor to anogenital and head and neck cancers although many patients infected with HPV will never develop any related symptoms or disease. The prevalence of any form of genital HPV in non-elderly adults in the U.S. is 42.5%, with the slightly higher prevalence in men. While there are over 40 different HPV types that may infect the genital tract, two (types 16 and 18) are associated with 66% of CC cases and two (6 and 11) cause 90% of anogenital warts.

This learning activity has been designed to bring HCPs’ knowledge of HPV vaccination and associated disease prevention up to date and to improve their competence and performance in identifying those who would benefit from vaccination.

Target Audience:

The following HCPs: primary care physicians and pediatricians; physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and pharmacists who practice in the aforementioned areas of specialty; and any other HCPs with an interest in or who clinically encounter patients who would benefit from HPV vaccination.

By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

  • Recall the epidemiology and complications of HPV
  • Describe the strains associated with the development of complications and disease and their related pathophysiologic processes
  • Discuss current U.S. HPV vaccination recommendations and apply them to patient cases
  • List current challenges to the prevention of HPV and high-risk groups

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